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sustainable cities

commentary

The evidence on the science of pollution sources and the political economy of air quality action points to three steps that can help make a clean-air future a reality.

blog post

The COVID-19 crisis has shown that effective public transport is vital to keeping cities running. Over the long term, public transport is one investment that can create jobs quickly while reducing carbon emissions, making roads safer and improving people’s access to their work and other opportunities.

event

The Tenth Session of the World Urban Forum (WUF10) is the premier international conference on cities and the first session to be held in the Middle East.

publication

This working paper describes sanitation access challenges in cities of the global south that have been overlooked in global indicators. In analyzing 15 cities, we found that almost two-thirds of urban residents lack access to safely managed sanitation, with access lowest in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. For these households, sanitation services are too expensive or unsafe. This paper highlights four key action areas for cities to improve sanitation access: extend the sewer and simplified sewer networks to household, communal and public toilets; support and regulate on-site sanitation in the absence of sewer systems; support citywide settlement upgrading; and make sanitation services affordable for all.

event

Transforming Transportation 2020 will take place from January 16 - 17, 2020 at the World Bank headquarters in Washington, DC. The theme for this year’s conference is “Connecting People for Sustainable Growth.”

event

Join WRI Ross Center for Sustainable Cities and NUMO for a presentation by Dr. James Longhurst, author of Bike Battles: A History of Sharing the American Road and professor of history at the University of Wisconsin. He will be joined by Peter Harnik, co-founder of the Rails-to-Trails Conservancy.

publication

This working paper describes water access challenges in cities of the global south that have been hitherto largely invisible in global indicators. In analyzing 15 cities, we found that piped utility water is the most affordable option, yet, on average, almost half of all households lack access, and most of those that do have access receive intermittent service. This paper highlights four key action areas for cities to improve water access: extending the formal piped water network, addressing context-specific causes of intermittent water service, pursuing diverse strategies to make water affordable, and supporting informal settlement upgrading.

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