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Global platform of indigenous and community lands

publication

This paper describes enabling factors in the areas of policy frameworks, leadership, coordination mechanisms, information and tools, and supportive financial processes that can help bridge the mainstreaming implementation gap. Real-world examples demonstrate how they can come together to support implementation.

publication

This paper discusses a framework for transformative adaptation in the agricultural sector, that is, broad, fundamental and systemic changes in food production systems in response to climate change. The paper describes how adaptation planners, funders, policymakers and researchers can incorporate transformative adaptation perspectives into their work on agriculture.

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This guidebook provides actionable, user-friendly strategies to improve natural resource governance by showing how to identify the networks, priorities, and values of relevant actors. The methodologies allow environmental practitioners to be more strategic in building resilient communities.

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Indigenous and community lands, crucial for rural livelihoods, are typically held under informal customary arrangements.

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Combating illegal logging is a key strategy for strengthening forest governance and eradicating forest-related corruption. This paper assesses how recent advances in forest monitoring, national regulations, and international cooperation have enabled more effective law enforcement measures, and identifies remaining challenges including illegal conversion of forests to agriculture, pervasive corruption, and the need for legal reform.

publication

Throughout the tropics, a growing number of states, provinces, and districts have embraced a jurisdictional approach to forest and land-use governance across a defined territory as a strategy to protect forests and reduce land-use emissions at scale. This paper discusses the opportunities provided by the jurisdictional approach, such as partnerships with supply chain actors and indigenous communities, as well as the challenges such as political turnover and limited public-sector capacity.

publication

There is a wealth of financial data and corporate governance information available that can be used to hold companies accountable to zero deforestation commitments and for activities linked to legal and illegal deforestation. This paper shows how radical transparency techniques have the potential to hold companies accountable for illegal or unethical activities and argues that the full potential of transparency solutions has yet to be unleased.

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