New: WRI statement on diversity, equity and inclusion

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governance

blog post

Returning to WRI as a Distinguished Senior Fellow on forest and governance issues, Frances Seymour reflects on the impact of technology and international efforts to turn the tide on deforestation.

blog post

The upcoming March for Science is an opportunity to push for evidence-based solutions. But real change comes not from placard-waving, but from the tireless, low-profile actions we each take every day at work, in town hall meetings and in our homes.

publication

The World Resources Report (WRR) examines if prioritizing access to core urban services, we can create cities that are prosperous and sustainable for all people. This first installment of the WRR developed a new categorization of cities into emerging, struggling, thriving, and stabilizing cities. It focuses on solutions for struggling and emerging cities—over half the cities included in the analysis—because they have the greatest opportunity to alter their development trajectory.

event

In the lead up to the Open Government Partnership Paris Summit, this event will bring together climate, open data, and open government civil society to expand new spaces for action and build momentum around implementation of the Paris Agreement. The OGP Summit provides an exciting opportunity to foster dialogue between governments and civil society and translate climate goals into tangible and ambitious commitments.

publication

This paper presents practical ideas for REDD+ countries to consider as they implement activities that establish or strengthen accountability mechanisms. It presents a general framework for evaluating the institutions, standards, and oversight mechanisms that most countries are developing as part of their REDD+ processes.

publication

Research by WRI and other organizations has shown that while national laws governing commercial land-based investments often mandate community participation in decision-making processes, in practice community participation remains weak, particularly for women. Women’s specific vulnerabilities, contributions to agriculture, and role as primary food providers in rural households necessitate their engagement in land acquisition and investment processes.

blog post

Most national governments can legally acquire land for public needs such as roads, schools and other infrastructure, in a process known as expropriation. But in many countries, weak laws allow governments and companies to take land for private interests without adequately compensating and resettling displaced people. Here are six ways to bring those laws up to global standards.

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