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Forum on Carbon Removal as a Climate Solution

The latest climate science shows that to avoid dangerous levels of global warming we must couple the rapid shift to a low carbon economy with efforts to capture and store some of the carbon we’ve already put into the atmosphere.

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Forum on Carbon Removal as a Climate Solution | September 18, 2018

About the Event

In the fight against climate change, most of the world’s attention has focused on ways to reduce emissions as quickly as possible. These efforts remain critically important; however, the latest climate science shows that to avoid dangerous levels of global warming we must couple the rapid shift to a low carbon economy with efforts to capture and store some of the carbon we’ve already put into the atmosphere.

On Tuesday, September 18, World Resources Institute hosted a major forum in Washington, DC reflecting on the challenging and important topic of carbon removal.

Tailored for a policy audience and featuring leading voices in technology, conservation and the environment, the event will tackle the big questions head on – how can carbon removal help in the fight against climate change? What are the different land management and technological approaches, and how can they be brought to scale in a safe and prudent manner? And finally, what practical steps can U.S. policymakers take to foster action?

The event will include a presentation on WRI’s latest research findings on carbon removal followed by a dynamic panel discussion moderated by Chris Mooney, Climate and Energy Reporter at The Washington Post, and a networking reception.

Speakers

  • Giana Amador, Co-Founder and Managing Director, Carbon180
  • Manish Bapna, Executive Vice President and Managing Director, WRI
  • Klaus Lackner, Director, Carbon180
  • Kelly Levin, Senior Associate, WRI
  • James Mulligan, Associate, WRI
  • Betsy Taylor, President, Breakthrough Strategies & Solutions
  • Chris Mooney, Climate and Energy Reporter, The Washington Post (moderator)

 

Image credit: ClimateWorks

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