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Secure land rights for women is recognized as critical for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), particularly for eradicating poverty and ending hunger and gender equality (Goals 1, 2 and 5). Progress has been made in securing women’s land rights through titling, but the challenges women face require a more robust range of interventions to ensure that they can make decisions on land use and reap benefit from the land. These include more gender-equitable laws as well as training and capacity-building for women. Secure land rights uplifts the whole community and moves the world closer to realizing the SDGs.

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Gender, social network analysis and native trees: All these combine to offer hope and transformation to a rural community in the Brazilian state of Para, where slash-and-burn monoculture has left forests blackened and nutrition sparse.

publication

India’s clean energy push will generate more than 330,000 full-time jobs over the next five years. Can Renewable Energy Jobs Help Reduce Poverty in India? finds that many of these jobs can provide steady incomes, healthcare benefits and skill-building opportunities for unskilled and semi-skilled workers. For India’s rural poor, especially women, clean energy jobs offer an alternative to subsistence farming. But decision-makers, from government officials to private sector leaders, must act to maximize poverty reduction impacts.

publication

Research by WRI and other organizations has shown that while national laws governing commercial land-based investments often mandate community participation in decision-making processes, in practice community participation remains weak, particularly for women. Women’s specific vulnerabilities, contributions to agriculture, and role as primary food providers in rural households necessitate their engagement in land acquisition and investment processes.

publication

Water scarcity challenges industries around the world. Global population growth and economic development suggest a future of increased demand, competition, and cost for limited freshwater supplies. Scarcer water, in turn, creates new challenges for energy supply because coal, oil, gas, and electricity production can require massive amounts of freshwater. Yet many countries will need more energy for energy-intensive water treatment options, like seawater desalination, to meet their growing demand for water. This report illustrates these emerging risks and offers ideas for finding solutions at the water-energy nexus.

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