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Climate Benefits, Tenure Costs

The Economic Case For Securing Indigenous Land Rights in the Amazon

A new report offers evidence that the modest investments needed to secure land rights for indigenous communities will generate billions in returns—economically, socially and environmentally—for local communities and the world’s changing climate. The report, Climate Benefits, Tenure Costs:...

Why Invest in Indigenous Lands?

Tenure-secure indigenous and other community forestlands are often linked to low deforestation rates, significant forest cover, and the sustainable production of timber and other forest products. New WRI research shows that securing indigenous forestland is also a low-cost, high-benefit investment and therefore makes good economic sense.

WRI hosted a press call with international climate experts just hours before the Paris Agreement crossed the threshold of entry into force on Wednesday, October 5, to give context around this historic moment. The Paris Agreement will enter into force 30 days after the thresholds of 55 countries and 55 percent of global emissions have been crossed.

India ratified the Paris Agreement on October 2, the birthday of Mahatma Gandhi. To date, 62 countries representing 51.89% of global emissions have joined the Paris Agreement. Fifty-five countries representing 55% of global emissions must join before the pact enters into force. Track progress on WRI's Paris Agreement Tracker.

Following is a statement from Manish Bapna, Executive Vice President and Managing Director of World Resources Institute:

NEW YORK (September 22, 2016)—Climate change is accelerating the intensity and frequency of extreme weather across the globe, with increasing risks to communities and businesses. The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), World Resources Institute (WRI), U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) and a network of partners today launched the Partnership for Resilience and Preparedness (PREP) to help communities, companies and investors use data to improve climate resilience planning.


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