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4 Keys to Scaled-up Climate Investment in Brazil

Call it bad timing: Brazil’s greenhouse gas emissions intensity is rising while that of most of the G20 countries decreases, just as more infrastructure investment will be needed to support expected economic growth and social inclusion. Representatives of commercial banks in Brazil, the Brazilian Development Bank (BNDES), the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), Brazil’s Ministry of Finance and others joined WRI experts to explore how they can collectively help the country make the transition to a low-carbon economy.

Today European Union leaders agreed on a climate and energy package that sets a domestic carbon reduction target of “at least” 40% by 2030.

Following is a statement by Jennifer Morgan, Director, Climate and Energy Programs, World Resources Institute:

Climate Equity: A Tale of 4 Countries

How should countries decide what to put into their national emissions reduction plans, and how should they be evaluated? What should governments, civil society, and the private sector take into account in thinking about the equitability of a country’s actions?

WRI’s new online tool, the CAIT Equity Explorer, aims to help answer these questions.

Race to the Top: Driving Ambition in a 2015 Climate Agreement

What if an international climate change agreement could set the rules for years to come, driving greater emissions reductions, more renewable energy and energy efficiency and a shift away from fossil fuel?

A consortium of research organizations, ACT 2015, has been thinking hard about what structure, processes and rules would need to be put in place to create confidence and predictability of action under this agreement.

Al Gore: A New Kind of Tipping Point for Climate Action

Much of the discussion in the environmental world focuses on tipping points—beyond which global warming becomes so great it causes ecosystems and economies to collapse. But former Vice President Al Gore thinks we’re reaching a new kind of tipping point, one where climate change action becomes a priority for governments and businesses.

By the Numbers: How the U.S. Economy Can Benefit from Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. benefits the economy by saving businesses and consumers money and improving public health.

A new study found that reducing emissions can yield significant economic benefits even before you factor in the advantages of avoiding drought, sea level rise, and other climate change impacts.

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