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What Does the Clean Power Plan Mean for Meeting U.S. Climate Goals?

On Monday, the Environmental Protection Agency announced its Clean Power Plan, the first time the United States has set standards to limit carbon pollution from existing power plants. The Plan sets emissions reduction goals for individual states; once the goals are finalized next year, states will develop plans to achieve the necessary reductions. EPA’s modeling indicates that the standards will reduce national carbon pollution from power plants by 30 percent below 2005 levels by 2030.

EPA’s New Clean Power Plan Is Both Achievable and Economically Beneficial

The EPA's proposed rule to cut carbon pollution from power plants is a critical step in avoiding the worst consequences of global warming. Without significant reductions from the power sector—America’s largest source of greenhouse gas emissions—the country cannot meet its goal of reducing its emissions 17 percent below 2005 levels by 2020. EPA’s proposal provides a flexible framework that puts those reductions within reach.

Here’s a look at how the proposed rule would impact states and the future of U.S. climate action.

3 Things We Need to Hear from Climate Ministers in Bonn

At the upcoming UNFCCC intersessional negotiation in Bonn, which begins on June 4, climate and environment ministers will have a two-day session to share their views on key issues for the international climate negotiations. Because these officials rarely attend such interim meetings, this is an unusual and major opportunity for them to show their commitment to strong international action, including steps needed this year to address climate change and secure a global climate agreement by 2015.

Here are three specific points that ministers could make to underscore their commitment to curbing climate change:

5 Essential Facts About Emissions Standards for Power Plants

On June 2, President Obama will unveil the latest—and likely greatest—emissions reduction policy since he announced his Climate Action Plan last year: new rules to limit carbon dioxide pollution from existing power plants. With power plants accounting for around one-third of U.S. emissions, these rules will address the country’s single-largest source of greenhouse gas pollution.

Unfortunately, there are a lot of misconceptions on what these standards are designed to achieve, the impact they will have, and why they’re so important. This blog highlights some of the most important aspects of these crucial actions.

Tudo o que você precisa saber sobre emissões na agropecuária

O GHG Protocol (sigla para Protocolo de Gases de Efeito Estufa em inglês) lançou novas diretrizes para auxiliar empresas agropecuárias a mensurarem e gerenciarem suas emissões de GEE na agricultura e na pecuária. São as primeiras diretrizes internacionais para o setor e irão ajudar nos esforços de mitigar seu impacto ambiental.

Mas o que são exatamente estas emissões agropecuárias e por que é importante reduzi-las? Baseados no que há de mais recente em termos de pesquisa e de dados, aqui está tudo o que você precisa saber sobre a pegada de carbono na agropecuária.

Following the Green Climate Fund board meeting in Songdo, South Korea, country delegates agreed on procedures to operationalize the fund. Established in 2011, the Green Climate Fund now has clear guidelines for how to channel funds to help developing countries advance low-carbon strategies and implement measures to enhance climate resilience.

The following is a statement by Dr. Andrew Steer, President and CEO, World Resources Institute:

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