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Blog Posts: financial institutions

  • The Price Is Wrong: New Report Calls for Fossil Fuel Prices that Reflect Environmental Costs

    A new report from the International Monetary Fund (IMF), Getting Energy Prices Right: From Principle to Practice, argues that the costs of coal, natural gas, gasoline, and diesel fail to account for these fuels’ environmental and social impacts—such as greenhouse gas emissions, air pollution, and traffic deaths.

    Setting prices that reflect these side effects—through taxes, licensing, or cap-and-trade systems—could reduce deaths from fossil fuel-related air pollution by 63 percent, decrease global carbon dioxide emissions by 23 percent, and generate revenues totaling about 2.6 percent of global GDP.

  • Is Adaptation Short-Changed? The Imbalance in Climate Finance Commitments

    One of the biggest successes from 2009’s COP 15 conference was securing funding for climate change adaptation and mitigation in developing countries. Donor nations agreed to “provide new and additional resources […] approaching $30 billion for the period 2010–2012, with balanced allocation between adaptation and mitigation.” They also committed to mobilize $100 billion a year by 2020.  
    

    But the agreement left a key question unresolved: how should funding be “balanced” between adaptation and mitigation? Should the funding balance be 50/50 between adaptation and mitigation or should it based on each country’s needs? Should funding include both private and public sector investment? These are some of the questions that negotiators will need to address during COP 19 in Warsaw.

    But whatever they decide as being a “balanced commitment,” one thing is clear: finance for adaptation needs to increase in the coming years.

  • A Closer Look at the Evolution of Brazil’s Overseas Investments

    From 2001 to 2011, Brazil’s per capita GDP more than tripled. At the heart of this domestic economic boom is the Brazilian Development Bank (BNDES).

    BNDES is Brazil’s key financial institution for domestic long-term financing, and it’s one of the main financial engines behind Brazil’s take-off as a leading Latin American economy. Its lending and equity investments are becoming increasingly important internationally.

    But what’s driving all of this growth? And what standards exist to ensure that Brazil’s overseas investments aren’t coming at the expense of the environment and human well-being? WRI seeks to address these questions and more in its new slide deck, “Emerging Actors in Development Finance: A closer look at Brazil’s Growth, Influence and the Role of BNDES.”

     

  • WRI Experts on Asia's Clean Energy Future

    Why is Asia such an important region for clean energy deployment? WRI experts respond.

  • The New Frontier in Environmental Finance

    China’s overseas presence has brought a new way of doing business to the world.

  • Emerging Actors in Development Finance: A Closer Look at Chinese and Brazilian Overseas Investments

    The landscape of development finance is changing rapidly. Traditionally, international financial flows moved from developed countries to developing countries. In the last decade, however, major emerging economies such as China and Brazil have fueled a growing trend of South-South development flows by increasingly channeling their overseas investments to other developing countries.

  • Have Countries Delivered on Fast-Start Climate Finance?

    As the reporting deadline for 2010 looms, developed countries will need to prove that they are honestly meeting their modest $30 billion commitment.

  • World Bank Energy Strategy Must Address Energy Poverty and Climate Change

    In consultations, a range of countries and interest groups have called for an energy strategy that supports sustainable development.

  • The Road to the Green Climate Fund

    This post originally appeared on the World Bank blog Development in a Changing Climate

  • Governing Climate Finance: The Importance of Reporting Guidelines and Review Mechanisms to Ensure Transparency & Accountability

    This "Budget Brief" originally appeared on the International Budget Partnership website. You can read the entire text, and download a PDF of the brief, here.

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