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watersheds

Restoration of the Chesapeake Bay will require reducing pollution from all sources, including urban stormwater runoff, which is one of the most difficult and expensive kinds of pollution to control. While stormwater contributes only 16-17 percent of the bay’s nutrient pollution—the rest comes from the air, and runoff from farms and wastewater treatment plants—dealing with it comprises 67 percent of states’ Bay pollution management costs.

A new paper by...

Nutrient Trading By Municipal Stormwater Programs In Maryland And Virginia: Three Case Studies

Restoring the ecological health of the Chesapeake Bay will require reducing nutrient pollution in urban stormwater runoff. Planning, designing, and constructing the local stormwater management projects that are needed will take many years and be very expensive. Implementing nutrient trading in...

Tracking Adaptation Success for Community Level Watershed Development in India

This working paper presents a joint effort by the World Resources Institute and the Watershed Organisation Trust (WOTR), a WSD implementing and research organization based in Pune, India, to develop an adaptation monitoring and evaluation (M&E) or tracking system to track success of WSD...

A Colorado wildfire that caused $25 million in damage also played havoc with Denver's drinking water supply, prompting the Mile-High City and others to invest in watershed protection to safeguard forests where the water they need originates. Protecting forested watersheds is critical for utilities that serve over 10,000 U.S. cities. Here are 10 factors that can guide watershed investment.

A Tale of Two Watersheds

As communities around the world face a growing water crisis, the need for lower-cost means to secure ample and clean water is becoming increasingly important.

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