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Some oppose carbon taxes on the grounds that they disproportionately hurt poor and middle-class households. But WRI research finds that with the right design, a carbon price could protect poor households from increasing energy prices, support the middle class and spur economic growth.

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WASHINGTON (MAY 11, 2016)– New analysis from World Resources Institute shows that Wisconsin is in a strong position to meet or exceed its emissions target under EPA’s Clean Power Plan to reduce emissions from the power sector. WRI finds that Wisconsin can build on existing energy efficiency and renewable energy investments to reduce its emissions and realize more economic benefits for its residents. However, by weakening its existing programs and declining to increase existing targets, the state will hamper progress and ultimately make complying with the Clean Power Plan more costly.

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New WRI analysis shows that Wisconsin can reduce its power sector emissions 21 percent below 2012 levels by 2030 just by following through on existing clean energy policies and making more efficient use of power plants. With a few additional steps, the state can far exceed the emissions reductions required by the Clean Power Plan.

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While the U.S. Supreme Court temporarily halted implementation of the Clean Power Plan (CPP), it’s in states’ own best interests to continue moving forward with compliance. New analysis finds Illinois can get 75 percent of the way to its CPP emissions-reduction target just through its existing clean energy policies and opportunities.

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Hard economic times have prompted West Virginia to look toward a future that depends less on coal and more on renewable energy, a higher-technology job market and even a price on climate-warming carbon dioxide.

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While coal miners have been the backbone of West Virginia's economy for decades, the industry is declining. New WRI research shows that a carbon price could provide billions of dollars a year for coal communities in West Virginia and other states, while also curbing air pollution and climate change.

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In the 18 debates held so far, moderators have asked about everything from Super Bowl picks to flower arrangements, while posing only a handful of questions on climate. This week's debates in Florida—ground zero for climate change in the United States—are the perfect opportunity to change that.

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