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The rainforests of Africa’s Congo Basin are the world’s second largest, and are increasingly one of the most threatened. Agriculture, mining, logging, and climate change are already chipping away and thinning out the forests’ edge and interior. The Congo Basin forests’ biggest threat, however, is unseen: a lack of good information. With poor infrastructure, government capacity challenges, and hard-to-detect patterns of change, the forests of the Congo Basin are among the most difficult in the world to monitor and manage.

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Extensive agricultural subsurface "tile" drainage in the Midwestern U.S. has important implications for nutrient pollution in surface water, notably the seasonal hypoxic "dead zone" in the Gulf of Mexico.

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Canada's forests provide critically important benefits to the nation - ranging from their economic contributions via the forest products industry to recreational opportunities to life-sustaining ecosystem services, such as soil erosion control and watershed protection.

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This analysis compiles a comprehensive set of geospatial indicators of human activities that lead to forest degradation and conversion. Illustrated by numerous maps, the results provide valuable insights for land-use planning and zoning.

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Mining and Critical Ecosystems: Mapping the risks is the culmination of a 2-year research effort aimed at identifying environmentally and socially vulnerable areas at risk from mining.

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Canada's forests provide critically important benefits to the nation - ranging from their economic contributions via the forest products industry to recreational opportunities to life-sustaining ecosystem services, such as soil erosion control and watershed protection.

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The romantic notion of the Russian forest as an unbroken band of boundless wilderness is a myth. In reality, the taiga consists of fragments of wilderness, separated by areas affected---either directly or indirectly–--by modern land use.

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In the absence of detailed information on forest condition, Global Forest Watch is identifying large tracts of forest unfragmented by roads to provide a coarse-scale picture of where areas that are relatively undisturbed by commercial-scale activities remain in the world's forest.

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