You are here

INDC

At a UN Summit in September, the largest-ever gathering of world leaders adopted the Sustainable Development Goals, a bold new roadmap to tackle climate change and extreme poverty by 2030. The global community now faces the real work of translating vision into action. Fortunately, early actions by some countries already align with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and help point the way forward.

The International Climate Action Initiative uses analysis, innovation and partnerships to achieve effective national policies and ambitious, equitable international climate action

We’re now halfway towards the 2020 deadline – set in 2009 – for developed countries to mobilize $100 billion a year in climate finance. It’s essential to show that developed countries are keeping their commitments so developing countries know they have support for ambitious action when countries meet to forge a new global climate agreement in Paris this December. So with five years to go, how close are we to $100 billion a year? And how could we get there?

Today India formally submitted its national climate plan (INDC) to the UNFCCC. The plan includes a commitment to reduce emissions intensity of its GDP by 33 to 35 percent by 2030 from 2005 levels, achieve about 40 percent cumulative electric power from non-fossil fuel based energy resources by 2030, and create an additional carbon sink of 2.5 to 3 million tonnes of carbon dioxide through additional forest and tree cover by 2030.

This week Brazil formally submitted its climate plan, also known as its Intended Nationally Determined Contribution (INDC). The country’s INDC comes on the heels of joint climate change declarations it’s made in recent months with China, Germany and the United States, showing that the country is committed to a creating a successful international climate agreement in Paris later this year.

Pages

Stay Connected