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Advancing women’s land right rights is critical to achieving gender equality. But WRI’s new working paper A Fair Share for Women: Toward More Equitable Land Compensation and Resettlement in Tanzania and Mozambique finds that, despite constitutional commitments to gender equality, governments in Tanzania and Mozambique are not protecting women from harmful commercial land deals. State officials’ failure to close gaps in land laws and overhaul ineffective regulations shortchanges women who receive little to no payment for their families’ land, while attempts to amplify women’s voices in community land decision-making are also falling short.

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It’s easy to see which households are connected to the grid, but regulatory commissions and utilities often lack information on supply interruptions, voltage levels or blackouts. It's a big reason so many Kenyans don't have reliable power.

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Grappling with Brazil's longest recession since the 1930s, government officials are under enormous pressure to combat rising unemployment, address corruption and control inflation. Yet two recent bills designed to solve the problem are misguided attempts that could degrade the environment, diminish human rights and hurt the economy.

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The goal of the recent Open Government Partnership Global Summit was to highlight the crucial role of open government as a countervailing force to the rise of various forms of nationalism and populism. Although open government alone can’t solve this and other global challenges such as extreme poverty, climate change and mass migration, these problems can’t be solved without greater transparency and civic participation.

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The climate and open government communities have historically worked in silos. That arrangement can't continue if countries are to successfully implement their national climate plans under the Paris Agreement.

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Most national governments can legally acquire land for public needs such as roads, schools and other infrastructure, in a process known as expropriation. But in many countries, weak laws allow governments and companies to take land for private interests without adequately compensating and resettling displaced people. Here are six ways to bring those laws up to global standards.

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