You are here

GHG emissions

Exploring Linkages Between National and Corporate/Facility Greenhouse Gas Inventories

National and corporate/facility level GHG inventory systems can help countries address climate change. However, these systems are often developed independently of each other, and confusion exists regarding the purpose of and need for each inventory type. This working paper seeks to describe...

Benefits of and Challenges to Energy Access in the 21st Century: Fuel Supply and Infrastructure

Testimony of Michael Obeiter before the US House of Representatives Committee on Energy & Commerce, Subcommittee on Energy & Power

The U.S. currently finds itself in the midst of an energy boom, driven by technological advances in the extraction of oil and natural gas. Our domestic energy resources, and the self-sufficiency they can bring, are the envy of much of the world. Yet we must also weigh the consequences of our...

It’s one thing to make data available, but it’s quite another to make it accessible.

That’s why today, WRI is launching a fully mobile-accessible version of its Climate Analysis Indicators Tool, or CAIT 2.0. The tool allows users everywhere to access, visualize, and compare greenhouse gas emissions data from 186 countries and 50 U.S. states, as well as other comprehensive, global climate data.

Last week, President Obama directed his administration to set new fuel efficiency and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions standards for medium- and heavy-duty vehicles, including large pick-up trucks, school buses, and tractors. Improving fuel efficiency standards from these vehicles—which make up 20 percent of U.S. transport emissions—can not only rein in emissions, it can help consumers save money at the gas pump.

From the GHG Measurement Frontline

A Synthesis of Non-Annex I Country National Inventory System Practices and Experiences

National greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory systems are complex but critical for meeting international reporting requirements and informing domestic low-carbon strategies and goals. This paper uses examples from five countries to discuss emerging good practices for the development of sustainable...

It is not possible to effectively address climate change without substantive [greenhouse gas] GHG emission reductions by the transport sector. But putting the pieces together – especially in developing countries – will require fine-tuning transportation climate finance readiness to match growing demand.

A new report for the German International Cooperation (Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)) outlines seven routes governments in the developing world can take to accelerate investment in low-carbon transport.

Coal is emerging as a major topic of conversation at the United Nations climate-change negotiations currently taking place in Warsaw – and rightly so. Indeed, it is a discussion that the world needs to have.

The latest findings of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change conclude that we are quickly using up our carbon “budget” – the amount of carbon that we can afford to emit while still having a good chance of limiting global warming to 2º Celsius. According to the IPCC, keeping the global temperature increase from pre-industrial levels below this threshold – the recognized tipping point beyond which climate change is likely to get seriously out of control – requires that the world emit only about 1,000 gigatonnes of carbon (GtC). More than half of this amount was already emitted by 2011. Unless we shift away from carbon-intensive behavior, the remaining budget will run out in roughly three decades.

Pages

Stay Connected