New: WRI statement on diversity, equity and inclusion

You are here

economics

data visualization

Tenure-secure indigenous and other community forestlands are often linked to low deforestation rates, significant forest cover, and the sustainable production of timber and other forest products. New WRI research shows that securing indigenous forestland is also a low-cost, high-benefit investment and therefore makes good economic sense.

blog post

Making our infrastructure cleaner and more sustainable could add as little as 5 percent to upfront costs, which could be fully offset by lower operating costs. WRI Board member and former President of Mexico Felipe Calderón reveals four ways to unlock capital for low-carbon infrastructure.

blog post

Coal production and power generation has driven Ningxia’s economy over the past decade. However, as an extremely thirsty industry, coal has put more stress on the area’s water supply and heightened competition with other users, including farms and households. A WRI working paper recommends developing a coordinated system to ensure sustainable development of water and economy in Ningxia.

blog post

Como o sétimo maior emissor de gases do efeito estufa, o Brasil tem as ferramentas e políticas necessárias para assumir a liderança no combate contra as mudanças climáticas. Esta oportunidade chega em um momento crucial para o país: seu plano nacional do clima - Contribuições Pretendidas Nacionalmente Determinadas (INDC, da sigla em inglês) – deve ser apresentado daqui há alguns dias como parte das negociações climáticas globais, quando uma crise econômica, seca e incerteza energética afetam suas decisões domésticas.

blog post

Brazil, the world’s seventh-biggest greenhouse gas emitter, has the relevant tools and policies it needs to become a leader in the fight to deal with climate change. This opportunity comes at a pivotal time for Brazil: its national climate plan—its Intended Nationally Determined Contribution (INDC)—should be submitted within days as part of global climate negotiations, while a national economic crisis, drought and energy uncertainty inform Brazil’s decisions at home.

publication

Until recently Brazil’s greenhouse gas emissions have been dominated by deforestation and land use change. But good progress in reducing deforestation and rapid growth in energy use have shifted this balance so that emissions from land use change and energy are roughly equal.

Pages

Stay Connected