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COPENHAGEN//WASHINGTON (June 6, 2016)—A partnership of leading international organizations is launching the Food Loss and Waste Accounting and Reporting Standard at the Global Green Growth Forum (3GF) 2016 Summit in Copenhagen. The FLW Standard is the first-ever set of global definitions and reporting requirements for companies, countries and others to consistently and credibly measure, report on and manage food loss and waste. The standard comes as a growing number of governments, companies and other entities are making commitments to reduce food loss and waste.

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"No one's actually making money from coal-fired power plants in the United States right now," said David Crane at WRI's MindShare event. That may seem a strange sentiment coming from a man who led NRG Energy, one of America's biggest power companies, but Crane is far from the typical energy exec.

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A disappointing experience in forest conservation laid the groundwork for marketing expert Daniel Vennard to lead WRI's Better Buying Lab. The initiative will bring together leading food service companies, manufacturers and restaurant chains to shift consumers towards more environmentally friendly plant-based proteins.

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More than 100 companies have now committed to use the best science available as the basis for setting greenhouse gas emissions-reduction targets. Targets informed by science might well be effective in reducing risks posed by water as well—but there are hurdles to overcome first.

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More and more companies are setting science-based emissions-reduction targets. These targets represent a company’s share of the global carbon budget, the amount of carbon the world can collectively emit while hoping to limit global temperature rise to 2 degrees C.

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Water scarcity challenges industries around the world. Global population growth and economic development suggest a future of increased demand, competition, and cost for limited freshwater supplies. Scarcer water, in turn, creates new challenges for energy supply because coal, oil, gas, and electricity production can require massive amounts of freshwater. Yet many countries will need more energy for energy-intensive water treatment options, like seawater desalination, to meet their growing demand for water. This report illustrates these emerging risks and offers ideas for finding solutions at the water-energy nexus.

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For the 13th year, World Resources Institute will host Stories to Watch, an event looking at the big stories that will shape the world in the coming year. Dr. Andrew Steer, president & CEO, World Resources Institute, will offer his views on the major economic, social, environment and development issues for 2016.

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The landmark Paris Agreement adopted at COP21 was made possible, in part, by the business community. Governments around the world needed to know, and be able to show, that business supported an ambitious approach to tackle climate change.

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Large, private sector energy customers wanting to buy more renewable energy are already driving change in electricity markets by scaling up clean power delivered through the grid. More renewables in countries’ power grids will accelerate progress toward emissions-reduction targets put forth in Paris.

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