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bus rapid transit (BRT)

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This case study in the World Resources Report, “Towards a More Equal City,” examines the processes of transformative change and the conditions enabling and inhibiting it in Pune, the second largest city in Maharashtra state, India. Many initiatives across diverse sectors have had a positive, qualitative impact on sustainability and service provision in Pune, particularly in its solid waste and transport sectors. These initiatives reflect important shifts in the local government’s attitudes and systems towards greater sustainability and equity and have had a positive impact on many lives.

publication

The working paper benchmarks BRT systems in China against international standards, in order to identify areas that need improvement. It assesses 30 of the 38 BRT indicators established in the BRT Standard, by employing analysis of variance (ANOVA) to compare the differences between mean Chinese and international BRTs, based on 99 data points, representing 59 cities (18 in China) and 21 countries.

blog post

Now that the Olympic torch has been extinguished after the 2016 Summer Games, a question that faces every Olympic host city now can be posed to Rio de Janeiro: was it worth it for its residents? While some overall long-term benefits may be in doubt, the answer is definitely yes when it comes to public transport.

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Cities designed for cars rather than people create an urban existence that is bad for the economy, bad for family life and terrible for the environment. We can -- we must -- do better in the 21st century, as WRI President and CEO Andrew Steer explains.

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Rio de Janeiro has long been known for its traffic congestion and lack of affordable, accessible public transit. Now, in celebration of its 450th anniversary and as the host city of the 2014 World Cup and the 2016 Summer Olympic Games, city leaders are beginning to transform Rio's image into one of a sustainable mobility leader.

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As Michael Bloomberg announces a package of assistance on road safety through Bloomberg Philanthropies’ Global Safety Initiative, here is an ugly truth: more people die in road crashes in India than anywhere else in the world.

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Designing efficient, low-carbon cities and transport systems can improve health and the climate.

A WRI study shows new bus rapid transit (BRT) projects in Mexico, Colombia, China, India, and South Africa have the potential to reduce GHG emissions by 31.4 million tons over the next 20 years. This amount is equivalent to the annual emissions of more than 6.5 million cars.

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Last year marked an important tipping point: for the first time, half of the global population lives in cities. Cities currently add 1.4 million people each week and this population growth comes with new buildings, roads and transport systems.

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