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This working paper studies 10 cases from Europe, Asia, and the United States to highlight the variety of social, political, and environmental contexts within which CC and LEZ schemes were planned and implemented. It aims to provide public communication strategies to safeguard successful implementation of transport policies.

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New mobility services could improve the lives of all urban inhabitants. This first ever global survey finds that applying three types of new mobility services – electric, on-demand minibuses, subsidized shared rides, and trip-planning and ticketing apps – can make public transport more affordable, accessible and sustainable, if integrated properly.

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This working paper discusses the successful experience of London, Singapore and Stockholm that can be applied to China, aiming to help Chinese readers understand how LEZ/CC policies work to alleviate air pollution and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and solve problems and challenges in the effort of congestion mitigation and emission reduction in China.

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After a 21 percent drop, a new report shows that food waste is on the rise again in the United Kingdom. Can the UK and the world meet the global goal of halving food waste by 2030?

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France and the UK announced increases in the amount of climate finance they will be providing in the coming years. France committed to increase its climate finance by €2 billion a year (around US$2.25 billion) to deliver a total of €5 billion a year by 2020, and the UK announced it will provide £5.8 billion (around US$8.8 billion) from its foreign aid budget for climate finance between 2016 and 2021. The announcements came during the summit launching the Sustainable Development Goals and heads of state meeting at the UN General Assembly.

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The shale gas revolution, which began nearly 10 years ago in the United States, is poised to spread across the globe. For many countries, shale gas could strengthen energy security while cutting emissions.

But unlocking this massive resource comes with a significant environmental risk: access to freshwater for drinking, agriculture, and industrial use.

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It is not possible to effectively address climate change without substantive [greenhouse gas] GHG emission reductions by the transport sector. But putting the pieces together – especially in developing countries – will require fine-tuning transportation climate finance readiness to match growing demand.

A new report for the German International Cooperation (Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)) outlines seven routes governments in the developing world can take to accelerate investment in low-carbon transport.

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This post was written by Lord Nicholas Stern, president of the British Academy, and Felipe Calderón, former president of Mexico and a WRI Board member. It originally appeared on Project Syndicate.

This Friday, in its latest comprehensive assessment of the evidence on global warming, the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change will show that the world’s climate scientists are more certain than ever that human activity – largely combustion of fossil fuels – is causing temperatures and sea levels to rise.

In recent years, a series of extreme weather events – including Hurricane Sandy in New York and New Jersey, floods in China, and droughts in the American Midwest, Russia, and many developing countries – have caused immense damage. Last week, Mexico experienced simultaneous hurricanes in the Pacific and in the Gulf of Mexico that devastated towns and cities in their path. Climate change will be a major driver of such events, and we risk much worse.

This puts a new debate center stage: how to reconcile increased action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions with strong economic growth.

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