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South Asia

Unaffordable and Undrinkable: Rethinking Urban Water Access in the Global South

In 2015, UNICEF and the World Health Organization reported that over 90% of the world’s population used improved drinking water sources. But new research suggests the indicators used by UNICEF/WHO grossly overestimated the state of water access, especially in cities of the global south. Analysis...

Ahmedabad: Town Planning Schemes for Equitable Development — Glass Half Full or Half Empty?

This case study in the World Resources Report, “Towards a More Equal City,” examines transformative urban change in Ahmedabad, India, by analyzing the land pooling and readjustment mechanism called Town Planning Scheme (TPS). This paper reviews the...

Porto Alegre: Participatory Budgeting and the Challenge of Sustaining Transformative Change

This case study in the World Resources Report, "Towards a More Equal City," examines transformative urban change in Porto Alegre, Brazil, through the lens of participatory budgeting. The research focuses on whether and how transformative change has taken...

Including the Excluded: Supporting Informal Workers for More Equal and Productive Cities in the Global South

A small but growing number of cities are adopting more inclusive approaches to informal workers and this offers important lessons for cities that seek a more equal, productive and environmentally sustainable future.

Informal workers account for 50 to 80 percent of urban employment and...

Powering Cities in the Global South: How Energy Access for All Benefits the Economy and the Environment

Millions of residents in some of the fastest growing cities in the world don’t have access to clean, reliable energy, and the challenge of reaching them is not getting easier. In 2012, only 58 percent of the urban population had access to electricity in low-income countries, and nearly 500...

Confronting the Urban Housing Crisis in the Global South: Adequate, Secure, and Affordable Housing

Well-located, secure and affordable housing is lacking in many cities and is only projected to get worse – it is estimated that 1.6 billion people will lack adequate housing by 2025. Good housing is fundamental to physical and financial security, economic productivity, healthy communities, and...

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