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This study assesses the impacts of different water sources (including surface water, groundwater, water transfer and desalination and wastewater reclamation) on the energy consumption of municipal water supply systems. Through the scenario analysis, the report also provides recommendations for policy makers to develop sustainable low-carbon water supply strategies and optimize the allocation of various types of water sources.

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In the fight to avert runaway climate change, no country is more important than China, and nowhere in China is more important than its booming cities. A recent visit to China offered a first-hand look at how WRI China is working with partners in Beijing, Chengdu, Qingdao and other cities to advance solutions that cut emissions while improving people's lives.

news item

WASHINGTON (August 22, 2016)—The 2016 G20 Summit in Hangzhou, China is just around the corner, September 4-5, and will be the first G20 Summit since the Paris Agreement was reached last December. Many are looking to the G20 for a clear signal from world leaders that the message of Paris was received, and that member countries are putting climate and clean energy action at the heart of their growth agendas.

publication

This technical note describes the data and methodology used to calculate BWS-China, building on the methodology described in previous Aqueduct publications (Shiklomanov and Rodda 2014; Gassert et al. 2013). In general, results show that Aqueduct’s global baseline water stress indicator maps and BWS-China maps share similar spatial patterns. However, upon closer examination, the maps show differences in some catchments. More detailed water withdrawal data by sector used in BWS-China can reveal new spatial patterns.

blog post

China's cities have a critical role to play in addressing climate change, but some huge metropolitan areas like Chengdu hadn't focused on reducing greenhouse gas emissions. That changed today as Chengdu and other Chinese cities and provinces committed to have their emissions peak by or before 2030 and decline after that.

publication

Changes in the sector, driven in part by objectives such as energy security, socio-economic development, increasing sustainable energy, environmental protection, climate change mitigation, public health, and increased public choice, are causing a number of trends: new and disruptive technologies,

news item

Eight recommended actions can improve energy efficiency in buildings to unlock a “triple win” and address economic, environmental and social challenges in world’s urban areas

WASHINGTON, D.C. (May 11, 2016) — A new policy roadmap from World Resources Institute, Accelerating Building Efficiency: Eight Actions for Urban Leaders, shows how city-level leaders worldwide can overcome barriers to improving building efficiency and reduce energy demand through policy and market action. WRI finds that better energy efficiency in buildings can unlock a “triple win” of economic, environmental and social benefits for cities, and taking action now can avoid locking in decades of inefficiency.

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