New: WRI statement on diversity, equity and inclusion

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A new report from the Coalition for Urban Transitions shows that national governments that invest in low-carbon cities can enhance economic prosperity, make cities better places to live and rapidly reduce carbon emissions. The report finds that implementing low-carbon measures in cities would be worth almost US$24 trillion by 2050 and could reduce emissions from cities by 90%.

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Buildings that emit no greenhouse gas emissions during their operation are vital to meeting the SDGs and Paris Agreement targets. But in the past, zero carbon buildings have been assumed to be only attainable by technologically advanced or wealthy countries. New WRI research finds there are policy pathways to reach zero carbon buildings regardless of location or development status. The report identifies eight pathways countries can take to reach zero carbon buildings by reducing energy demand and cleaning energy supply.

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This paper examines how policies and technologies will impact China’s non-CO2 GHG emissions under various scenarios. The analysis shows that China’s policy development since 2015 has led to a significantly lower non-CO2 GHG emissions trajectory than expected under policies as of 2015 and there is significant potential to further reduce non-CO2 GHG emissions.

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China's central government has turned to regional integration for the country's next stage of economic development, announcing or strengthening mega-region initiatives like the Yangtze River Delta Integration, Greater Bay Area Development and Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Integration. If done right, this strategy can also help shift China onto a low-carbon pathway.

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Dr. Fang Li has been appointed as the new Director for WRI China. Dr. Fang is an experienced leader with deep expertise in environmental economics and a strong track record of forging progress on China’s critical environment and development challenges.

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China will adhere to its commitments under the Paris Agreement to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and is on track to exceed key targets early, despite the U.S. administration’s intention to withdraw from the historic climate pact, a senior Chinese climate expert said after a meeting between U.S. and Chinese policy experts in San Francisco.

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While more than one-third of China still suffers from high water stress, there are signs of improvement: New WRI analysis shows that the rate of increase in the country's water withdrawals has slowed from 5.1 billion cubic meters per year in 2001-2010 to 1.6 billion cubic meters per year from 2010-2015.

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The Paris Agreement was the result of unexpected collaboration between the United States and China. President Trump has backed his nation out of the deal, but the surge in subnational action in the U.S. creates an opportunity for joint research, knowledge transfer and continued low-carbon development.

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