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A new report from the Coalition for Urban Transitions shows that national governments that invest in low-carbon cities can enhance economic prosperity, make cities better places to live and rapidly reduce carbon emissions. The report finds that implementing low-carbon measures in cities would be worth almost US$24 trillion by 2050 and could reduce emissions from cities by 90%.

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At its core, environmental democracy involves three mutually reinforcing rights: the ability for people to freely access information on environmental quality and problems, to participate meaningfully in decision-making, and to seek enforcement of environmental laws or compensation for damages

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Historically, the world has talked about climate change primarily as an environmental issue. We focus on the amount of greenhouse gas emissions in the atmosphere, rising seas, climbing temperatures, and other hard data. While this narrative is important, it’s missing a critical component — people.

After all, communities everywhere will be affected by climate change’s impacts. Those in impoverished, developing nations will likely be hit hardest. That’s why it’s necessary to talk about climate change not just as an environmental issue, but also as an issue of climate justice focused on the way in which people, especially the most vulnerable, are being affected.

project

Inspiring, enabling and mobilizing action to restore vitality to degraded landscapes and forests around the globe.

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We recently travelled to Santiago, Chile, a sprawling city of six million people just beyond the Andes. Our purpose was to attend the first sub-regional workshop of the Climate Justice Dialogue, a new initiative led by the World Resources Institute (WRI) and the Mary Robinson Foundation—Climate Justice (MRFCJ). But before we even made it inside the conference center, we were confronted by a poignant, real-life example of climate justice.

publication

This report addresses the status of access to information, participation, and justice in nine countries -- Chile, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Mexico, South Africa, Thailand, Uganda, and the United States.

publication

Prepared through a close collaboration between Global Forest Watch Chile, a consortium of the Comit Nacional Prodefensa de la Fauna y Flora (CODEFF) and the Universidad Austral de Chile, and Global Forest Watch staff in Washington D.C., this report aims to provide a comprehensive information sour

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