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This report is aimed at helping governments and corporations gain a better understanding of water stress associated with local economic development and its impact on socio-economic development in Ningxia. It first analyzes water resources profiles, water resources management and current water use patterns in Ningxia, and applies the Aqueduct Water Risk Framework of the World Resources Institute to assess Ningxia’s baseline water stress focusing on the development of the local coal industry and its impact on water resources and provided suggestions for better management of Ningxia’s water resources.

This technical note describes the data and methodology used to calculate BWS-China, building on the methodology described in previous Aqueduct publications (Shiklomanov and Rodda 2014; Gassert et al. 2013). In general, results show that Aqueduct’s global baseline water stress indicator maps and BWS-China maps share similar spatial patterns. However, upon closer examination, the maps show differences in some catchments. More detailed water withdrawal data by sector used in BWS-China can reveal new spatial patterns.

Water scarcity challenges industries around the world. Global population growth and economic development suggest a future of increased demand, competition, and cost for limited freshwater supplies. Scarcer water, in turn, creates new challenges for energy supply because coal, oil, gas, and electricity production can require massive amounts of freshwater. Yet many countries will need more energy for energy-intensive water treatment options, like seawater desalination, to meet their growing demand for water. This report illustrates these emerging risks and offers ideas for finding solutions at the water-energy nexus.

Decision-makers need future projections on water supply and demand. However, most of these decision-makers operate at the administrative or political scales, and therefore require country-level projections. This technical note utilized a spatial aggregation methodology to bring sub-catchment scale Aqueduct Water Stress Projections up to the country scale, fulfilling this need.

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