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Climate, Energy & Transport

A Business Case for Building Climate Resilience

This is the final installment of WRI’s blog series, Adaptation and the Private Sector. Each post explores ways to engage the private sector in helping vulnerable communities adapt to the impacts of climate change.

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3 Ways Governments Can Involve the Private Sector in Climate Change Adaptation

As the impacts of climate change become ever-clearer, so does the challenge of adaptation. While the World Bank estimates that developing countries will need $70-$100 billion annually through 2050 to adapt to climate change, the public sector alone cannot meet this financial goal. Rather, the world needs the human, technical, and financial resources of the private sector to help bridge this significant adaptation finance gap and make vulnerable communities more climate-resilient.

National governments have a critical role to play in supporting and stimulating private sector investment in adaptation. In order to engage the private sector in helping vulnerable populations prepare for the effects of climate change, developing country governments can take three types of actions:

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7 Ways to Attract and Use Climate Finance for Transport

It is not possible to effectively address climate change without substantive [greenhouse gas] GHG emission reductions by the transport sector. But putting the pieces together – especially in developing countries – will require fine-tuning transportation climate finance readiness to match growing demand.

A new report for the German International Cooperation (Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)) outlines seven routes governments in the developing world can take to accelerate investment in low-carbon transport.

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Equity in an International Climate Agreement: Lessons from Other Multilateral Regimes

The nineteenth United Nation Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Conference of the Parties (COP) is shaping up to be a “construction COP” where nations take steps toward achieving a new global climate agreement by 2015. But with wide-ranging interests at the same table, establishing equity has once again taken center stage in the international climate negotiations and will be a key issue for achieving a new global climate agreement.

The 2015 agreement is meant to apply to all nations, raising obvious questions about which countries will take what actions and how equity factors into those determinations. Since ensuring all Parties consider the climate agreement fair is a necessary first step to meaningful participation, WRI’s new paper, Equity Lessons from Multilateral Regimes for the New Climate Agreement, examines how equity is treated in a number of multilateral environmental, trade, human rights and international aid agreements.

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EMBARQ India received special recognition in the third edition of the Volvo Sustainable Mobility Awards, announced at last week’s Volvo Nobel Memorial Seminar in Bangalore, India. EMBARQ India’s submission, “Towards a Walkable and Sustainable Bengaluru: A Safe Access Project for Indiranagar Metro,” aims to improve safety and accessibility for bikers and pedestrians around Bangalore’s metro stations.

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