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Climate, Energy & Transport

The Habitat III conference next week will see more than 45,000 leaders, decision-makers and experts sign into force the New Urban Agenda for sustainable cities. But the Agenda and the Habitat process don't stand alone -- going forward, they will be part of intensified efforts to achieve sustainable, equal development and combat climate change.

In the fight to avert runaway climate change, no country is more important than China, and nowhere in China is more important than its booming cities. A recent visit to China offered a first-hand look at how WRI China is working with partners in Beijing, Chengdu, Qingdao and other cities to advance solutions that cut emissions while improving people's lives.

India ratified the Paris Agreement on October 2, the birthday of Mahatma Gandhi. To date, 62 countries representing 51.89% of global emissions have joined the Paris Agreement. Fifty-five countries representing 55% of global emissions must join before the pact enters into force. Track progress on WRI's Paris Agreement Tracker.

Following is a statement from Manish Bapna, Executive Vice President and Managing Director of World Resources Institute:

Now that the Olympic torch has been extinguished after the 2016 Summer Games, a question that faces every Olympic host city now can be posed to Rio de Janeiro: was it worth it for its residents? While some overall long-term benefits may be in doubt, the answer is definitely yes when it comes to public transport.

The G20 Summit in Hangzhou, China, this September brings together leaders of the world's largest economies for the first such gathering since the 2015 Paris Agreement on climate. China and Germany, the G20's current and incoming presidents, need to demonstrate leadership to prove that the top 20 largest economies are prepared to galvanize strong action on climate and clean energy.

With three months to go until the next international climate negotiations, many developing countries are working hard to live up to the promises made in the Paris Agreement. But many institutions in developing countries face challenges in accessing and effectively deploying international climate finance. Representatives of two groups from Africa -- the Senegal-based Centre de Suivi Ecologique and Kenya's National Environmental Management Authority -- got together in July to help each other tackle some of these challenges.

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