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Power Plant Rules Are Critical for Curbing U.S. Emissions

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will soon unveil its first-ever emissions standards for existing power plants. These rules represent the most significant component of the U.S. Climate Action Plan—and moreover, they’re an essential step for overcoming the climate change challenge.

5 Ways Arkansas Can Reduce Power Plant Emissions

Arkansas has already taken steps to reduce its near-term power sector CO2 emissions by implementing energy efficiency policies. And the state has the opportunity to go even further. In fact, new WRI analysis finds that Arkansas can reduce its CO2 emissions 39 percent below 2011 levels by 2020 by implementing new clean energy strategies and taking advantage of existing infrastructure. Achieving these reductions will allow Arkansas to meet moderately ambitious EPA power plant emissions standards, which are due to be finalized in 2015.

National Climate Assessment Reveals How Climate Change Impacts Your Neighborhood

The National Climate Assessment, released today, is the most comprehensive assessment of U.S. climate impacts to date.

Here’s a look at how communities across the country are already being affected—as well as steps we can take at the local, state, and federal levels to rein in future warming.

Florida’s Vulnerability to Sea Level Rise Attracts Congressional Attention

As coastal communities across the United States continue to fall victim to drought, coastal flooding, and other impacts of extreme weather and climate change, leaders at the metropolitan and federal levels are beginning to take action. Yet, Congressional action is an essential but missing piece to comprehensively addressing climate change.

However, Florida's continuing sea-level rise vulnerability suggests Congress may shift its attention to climate impacts.

4 Takeaways from IPCC Report Reveal Worsening Impacts of Climate Change

The first installment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report (AR5)—released in September—confirmed the overwhelming scientific consensus that the world is warming, largely due to human activities. The Working Group II (WGII) report, released today, takes this finding a step further: Not only is climate change happening, but every continent on earth is now experiencing its impacts.

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