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Cutting Carbon: States Can Use What they’ve Already Got to Whittle Power Plant Emissions

As the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency prepares to release greenhouse gas standards for existing power plants on June 2, state officials are weighing options on the best ways to cut carbon dioxide emissions.

We have shown how some states may be able to comply with these standards.

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Florida Already Feeling Effects of Climate Change

In an article originally published in Tampa Bay Times, Lee Thomas discusses the effects of climate change in Florida, and the need for state-level action.

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Snapshots of Miami Sea Level Rise

Miami ranks as the most vulnerable city in the world to the risk of coastal flooding caused by sea level rise.

Despite Miami’s vulnerability to sea level rise, there is reason to be hopeful: Many of the city’s local leaders and community residents are emerging as innovators in local climate action.

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U.S.-China Clean Energy Cooperation: Status, Challenges, and Opportunities

Testimony of Sarah Forbes before the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission

In an April 25, 2014 testimony, Sarah Forbes describes the context for US-China collaboration on clean energy, outlining the need for policies that encourage innovation throughout the value chain. She also highlights how collaboration with China can advance U.S. energy goals, and suggests ways...

How U.S.-China Cooperation Can Expand Clean Energy Development

Sarah Forbes testified before the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission, discussing U.S.-China cooperation on clean energy and its global impact on climate change.

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Drought Is Only One Explanation for California’s Water Crisis

As California lawmakers move forward with potential solutions to the state’s current water shortage, it’s important to consider the full context of underlying reasons for California’s water vulnerability.

Our research shows that about 66 percent of the state’s irrigated agriculture—its biggest water user—faces extremely high levels of baseline water stress. This means that more than 80 percent of the available water supply is already being used by farms, homes, businesses, and energy producers. It’s clear that even without drought, the state would be in trouble.

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5 Overlooked Deforestation Hotspots

The UN has announced that March 21 be recognized as the International Day of Forests. In tandem with the celebration of forests worldwide, is an awareness that we are still losing forests and trees much faster than they can regrow.

Many people are working to reverse tree cover loss in the world’s largest remaining forests. But several hugely important deforestation hotspots are still flying under the radar. These forest areas are seeing alarming trends and/or have lost much of their tree cover. We are using the latest data from Global Forest Watch, an online forest monitoring and alert system, to dive deeper into some under-reported deforestation hotspots.

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