You are here


In 2009, Indonesia made a bold move by voluntarily pledging to achieve a 26 percent reduction in emissions against the business-as-usual scenario in 2020, or 41 percent with international support. Being a developing country with so much promise for economic growth and development, the international community applauded Indonesia for this daring target, which became a game-changer in the stagnant climate negotiations at the time. The National Action Plan on Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emission (RAN-GRK) was soon issued to guide its implementation.

The conventional wisdom that addressing climate change will cost money, jobs and growth is being well and truly debunked, says WRI President and CEO Andrew Steer. Next week's Climate Week NYC and UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) Summit illustrates this in spades.

What Counts: Tools to Help Define and Understand Progress Towards the $100 Billion Climate Finance Commitment

This working paper, a collaboration with WRI, CPI and ODI, aims to make a positive contribution in the lead up to Paris by first unpacking the key variables Parties have emphasized in debates about “what counts”, and then proposing an approach to classifying climate finance that Parties could...

We’re now entering the final, significant stages of negotiations leading up to the major climate summit in Paris in December known as COP21, where countries will reach a new international climate agreement. There are now two week-long negotiating sessions remaining before Paris; the first takes place next week in Bonn, Germany. What issues will negotiators face and what needs to happen at the Bonn meeting?


Stay Connected