You are here

renewable energy

By the Numbers: The New Climate Economy

How should politicians prioritize between robust economic growth and solving the problem of climate change?

A new report reveals an encouraging answer: There’s no need to choose. Better Growth, Better Climate, finds that low-carbon investments – if done right – could cost about the same as conventional infrastructure, but would deliver significantly greater economic, social, and environmental benefits in the long-run.

Share

The Plain Bad Economics of Today’s Energy Prices

Christine Lagarde, Managing Director of the IMF, recently launched the latest book in a series on what good fiscal policy should look like in a world of environmental externalities.

The message was clear: Ministers of finance and economics should design their tax systems skillfully so as to tax bad things, like pollution and congestion, rather than good things like work and profit. Not to do so is plain, bad economics.

Share

The Price Is Wrong: New Report Calls for Fossil Fuel Prices that Reflect Environmental Costs

A new report from the International Monetary Fund (IMF), Getting Energy Prices Right: From Principle to Practice, argues that the costs of coal, natural gas, gasoline, and diesel fail to account for these fuels’ environmental and social impacts—such as greenhouse gas emissions, air pollution, and traffic deaths.

Setting prices that reflect these side effects—through taxes, licensing, or cap-and-trade systems—could reduce deaths from fossil fuel-related air pollution by 63 percent, decrease global carbon dioxide emissions by 23 percent, and generate revenues totaling about 2.6 percent of global GDP.

Share

What Does Environmental Democracy Look Like?

At its core, environmental democracy involves three mutually reinforcing rights: the ability for people to freely access information on environmental quality and problems, to participate meaningfully in decision-making, and to seek enforcement of environmental laws or compensation for damages

Share

Tackling U.S. Corporations’ 3 Challenges To Buying Renewable Energy

Sixty percent of the largest U.S. companies have now set climate and energy goals to increase their use of renewable energy. The problem is that they face several market challenges in actually reaching these goals.

That's where the new Corporate Renewable Energy Buyers’ Principles come in.

Share

Corporate Renewable Energy Buyers' Principles

Increasing Access to Renewable Energy

The Corporate Renewable Energy Buyers' Principles frame the challenges and common needs faced by large renewable energy buyers.

Twelve corporate signatories developed these principles to spur progress on resolving the challenges they face when buying renewable energy, and to add...

Closing the Renewable Energy Investment Gap

There’s a growing gap between current investment in low-carbon energy and what’s needed to meet world demand while avoiding the worst impacts of climate change. The good news is there’s sufficient capital and investor interest to close much of this gap.

However, policies that encourage market certainty and level the playing field between different energy sources are needed to attract the volume of investment required, according to a special International Energy Agency (IEA) report, the World Energy Investment Outlook, released this month.

Share

Tracking Climate Finance in Developing Countries: Easing the Way Forward

A new WRI working paper, “Monitoring Climate Finance in Developing Countries: Challenges and Next Steps,” draws on a series of three regional workshops in Latin America, Africa, and Asia where representatives from governments and other agencies discussed the challenges in monitoring climate finance flows, and some of the efforts their countries are making to overcome these challenges.

Share

Shifting to Renewable Energy Can Save U.S. Consumers Money

The Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) carbon emissions regulations for existing power plants, released earlier this month, are an opportunity for utility customers to save big with renewable energy—accelerating the current trend.

Share

Pages

Stay Connected

Sign up for our newsletters

Get the latest commentary, upcoming events, publications, maps and data. Sign up for the biweekly WRI Digest.