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Empowering Environmental Entrepreneurs in Emerging Economies

This is the fifth installment of a five-part blog series on scaling environmental entrepreneurship in emerging markets. In this series, experts in the field provide insights on how business accelerators, technical assistance providers, investors, and the philanthropic community can work with developing market entrepreneurs to increase their economic, environmental, and social impacts. Read the rest of the series.

Here at WRI, our mantra is “making big ideas happen.” But these “big ideas” don’t need to come exclusively from “big” players like corporations and development banks. In 1999, we set out to prove a new concept—that entrepreneurs and the small and medium-sized businesses they create could make a profound impact on the health of the planet.

Thirteen years on, the proof of our concept is demonstrated daily around the world. As engines of economic growth and laboratories for environmental and social innovation, small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are helping to build modern economies that improve people’s lives while conserving natural resources.

This is especially true in developing countries, where such businesses can account for as many as four in five jobs and almost one-third of GDP. Which is why, back in 1999, WRI chose Latin America and Asia as the focus of its pioneering New Ventures project to nurture environmental entrepreneurs.

Correcting the World’s Greatest Market Failure: Climate Change at the Multilateral Development Banks is a new analysis by the World Resources Institute that examines the challenges of mainstreaming climate change at the Multilateral Development Banks (MDBs).

Correcting the World’s Greatest Market Failure: Climate Change at the Multilateral Development Banks is a new analysis by the World Resources Institute that examines the challenges of mainstreaming climate change at the Multilateral Development Banks (MDBs).

Designing the Clean Development Mechanism

Operational and institutional issues

Prepared for the OECD Climate Forum, this paper addresses the two key institutional dimensions of the CDM: Design of the regulatory framework and design of the implementation models.

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