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This post was co-authored with Eduardo Arenas Hernández Jr. and Ana Domínguez, who work for Reforestamos Mexico.

This is the first post in a two-part series on illegal logging in Latin America, with key insights coming from the Forest Legality Alliance’s recent event, “Legal Forest Products and International Trade: A Regional Perspective.” The first installment focuses on the root causes of Latin America’s illegal wood trade, while the second highlights potential solutions to the problem.

Mexico exports a significant amount of wood, especially to the United States. In fact, based on data from the U.S. International Trade Commission, the United States imported an estimated $1.4 billion worth of paper and timber products from Mexico in 2011.[^1]

But Mexico—and Latin America as a whole—struggle when it comes to ensuring legality in forest activities. Illegal logging is documented throughout several Latin American nations and prevalent in some, and there is a risk of importing products to the United States that are tainted with illegality.

An Analysis of Access to Central Africa's Rainforests

Identifies relatively undisturbed forest blocks in Central Africa, providing maps that show their size, condition and current levels of protection -- offering the first comprehensive picture of where logging concessions are located throughout the region.

1999-2000 Allocation of Logging Permits in Cameroon

Fine-tuning Central Africa's First Auction System...

Cameroon's forestry legislation is implemented by the allocation of ventes de coupe, Unités Forestières d'Aménagement (UFA) and community forests. This paper presents information on how different logging rights were allocated and to whom.

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