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international climate policy

WASHINGTON (September 22, 2014)— More than 120 heads of state will converge in New York City on September 23, 2014 for the United Nations’ Climate Summit. The Summit — the largest gathering in history of heads of state on the issue of climate change — will serve as a platform for countries and companies to put forward new initiatives to help usher in a low-carbon economy.

How should politicians prioritize between robust economic growth and solving the problem of climate change?

A new report reveals an encouraging answer: There’s no need to choose. Better Growth, Better Climate, finds that low-carbon investments—if done right—could cost about the same as conventional infrastructure, but would deliver significantly greater economic, social, and environmental benefits in the long-run.

WASHINGTON- As heads of state, business leaders and civil society head to New York City for the UN Climate Summit on September 23, World Resources Institute will host a press teleconference with Manuel Pulgar-Vidal, COP20 President and Environment Minister, Peru; Tony de Brum, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Marshall Islands; and Dr. Zou Ji, Deputy Director of the NCSC (think tank of NDRC) in China.

Recent reports from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) revealed that the impacts of climate change are already “widespread and consequential.” Yet the effects we may see in the future still largely depend on the actions countries take to reduce their emissions today.

Our new infographic, based on IPCC data, depicts the likely consequences of various emissions pathways ranging from a low-carbon future to a fossil fuel-intensive one.

China and the United States established eight new pacts this week to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. Half of these announcements focused on a single climate change mitigation measure—carbon dioxide capture, utilization and storage (CCUS).

China and the United States are world’s leaders when it comes to CCUS research and development, and this week’s agreements build on a long history of CCUS collaboration between the two nations. In fact, China-US partnership on CCUS has in many respects now left the theoretical feasibility realm and entered the “steel-in-the-ground” phase.

After the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, Japan halted all existing nuclear operations and significantly scaled back its 2020 emissions-reduction target. As Japan revises its energy policy over the next few years, officials will decide the future of the country’s energy mix—and its climate action.

New research reveals that Japan can likely go beyond its emissions-reduction target with existing initiatives, but needs to pursue more ambitious action in the long-term to truly overcome the climate change challenge.


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