New: WRI 2014 Annual Report — Greater Reach, Deeper Engagement, More Impact

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Green Climate Fund

Green Climate Fund Moves Forward; Will Soon Disburse Climate Finance through 7 Institutions

The Green Climate Fund (GCF), expected to become the main vehicle for securing and distributing finance, moved one step closer to disbursing funds this week. Its resources will support a range of activities that reduce emissions or foster resilience—such as installing renewable energy, helping farmers grow drought-resistant crops and reducing deforestation.

Today, President Obama released his 2016 Budget Request outlining the administration’s spending plans for the coming fiscal year. The request includes $500 million in funding for the Green Climate Fund, and $230 million for the Climate Investment Funds. The budget allocation to the Green Climate Fund is part of the $3 billion pledge the U.S. made in November 2014, while $230 million requested for the Climate Investment Funds would complete a commitment made under the Bush Administration in 2008.

Today, at the international climate conference in Lima, Peru (COP20), the government of Belgium pledged to contribute more than 50 million Euros (around $62 million US) to the Green Climate Fund, edging the fund past its $10 billion goal for 2014. This is an important marker in making the Green Climate Fund operational.

Following is a statement by Athena Ballesteros, Finance Director, World Resources Institute:

WASHINGTON— On November 20, 2014, countries held a pledging conference of the Green Climate Fund in Berlin – where countries announced their financial commitments to the Fund. These funds will be used to support vulnerable countries to respond to the mounting risks of climate change, and to reduce emissions that cause climate change.

4 Keys to Scaled-up Climate Investment in Brazil

Call it bad timing: Brazil’s greenhouse gas emissions intensity is rising while that of most of the G20 countries decreases, just as more infrastructure investment will be needed to support expected economic growth and social inclusion. Representatives of commercial banks in Brazil, the Brazilian Development Bank (BNDES), the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), Brazil’s Ministry of Finance and others joined WRI experts to explore how they can collectively help the country make the transition to a low-carbon economy.

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