New: Pivotal Year—WRI’s 2015 Annual Report

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energy efficiency

Strengthening Governance of India's Appliance Efficiency Standards and Labeling Program

This issue brief examines how improved governance can help make India’s appliance efficiency standards and labelling program more successful. We focus particularly on standard setting, program implementation, and monitoring and verification through the lens of transparency, accountability,...

WRI’s fact sheet series, How States Can Meet Their Clean Power Plan Targets, examines the ways states can meet or even exceed their standards under the CPP while minimizing compliance costs, ensuring reliability, and harnessing economic opportunities. This post explores these opportunities in Michigan.

As part of the Clean Power Plan, the U.S. EPA requires Michigan to reduce its power sector emissions by 33 percent below 2012 levels by 2030. New analysis shows the state can go even further while...

PARIS (December 3, 2015) – At the Paris climate conference (COP21), building efficiency took center stage with the launch of the Global Alliance for Buildings and Construction.

Supported by a new $2 million grant from the Global Environment Facility (GEF), World Resources Institute (WRI) will leverage and expand its work with city and subnational governments to advance building efficiency policies and actions. The GEF funding to WRI and its partners will help scale up the Building Efficiency Accelerator, which was launched in 2014. These efforts will be coordinated by WRI Ross Center for Sustainable Cities, which aims to create more livable and sustainable cities around the world.

How Virginia Can Meet Its Clean Power Plan Targets

This fact sheet examines how Virginia can use its existing policies and infrastructure to meet its emission standards under the Clean Power Plan while minimizing compliance costs, ensuring reliability, and harnessing economic opportunities. Read about additional analyses in WRI's fact sheet...

The WRI analysis shows that if Virginia achieves its current goals to improve efficiency and increase use of renewable energy while also making more efficient use of existing natural gas plants, the state can decrease carbon emissions from Virginia’s power sector by 43 percent below 2012 levels by 2030 – well beyond the state’s mass-based target of 23 percent reductions required under the Clean Power Plan.

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