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Welcome to the Anthropocene, an era built on centuries of economic growth, In the 50 years before this new age, the human economic footprint grew faster in terms of GDP than at any time in recorded history. By the year 2100, it could grow to Bigfoot proportions, severely straining the global commons we all depend upon. Now it's time to tame Bigfoot. Andrew Steer explains.

Rapidly growing cities are finding it increasingly difficult to provide their residents with core services, like housing, water, energy and transportation — a challenge that is exacerbated as the share of poor people living in urban areas grows. New research from the World Resources Institute finds that in most cities in the Global South, more than 70 percent of residents lack reliable access to basic services like livable, well-located housing; clean water; sustainable energy; and accessible and affordable transportation. The World Resources Report: Towards a More Equal City examines whether prioritizing access to core urban services will create cities that are prosperous and sustainable for all people.

When delegates gather in Quito for Habitat III to adopt the New Urban Agenda for sustainable cities, they should keep in mind people like Adelaida, a banker and mother in Accra, Ghana, where unreliable, expensive electricity is a challenge. As a forthcoming paper of the World Resources Report shows, ensuring access to affordable energy and the economic opportunity it brings will be essential for a sustainable, prosperous urban future.

WASHINGTON (August 22, 2016)—The 2016 G20 Summit in Hangzhou, China is just around the corner, September 4-5, and will be the first G20 Summit since the Paris Agreement was reached last December. Many are looking to the G20 for a clear signal from world leaders that the message of Paris was received, and that member countries are putting climate and clean energy action at the heart of their growth agendas.


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