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How the US Can Save Billions by Reducing Electricity Use

Homes and commercial buildings account for 74 percent of electricity demand in the United States, making them a critical part of any plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

The good news is that policies put into place over the last three decades—including appliance efficiency standards, voluntary labeling programs like ENERGY STAR, and state energy-savings targets—have already helped offset rising demand for electricity and saved consumers billions of dollars. New research shows that with the right policies in place, consumers and the environment can capture even greater benefits.

How the U.S. Can Produce Cleaner Energy While Capturing Economic Benefits

A new WRI study finds that there are many “win-win” opportunities for the United States to reduce emissions and save money for consumers and businesses.

Over the coming weeks, our blog series, Lower Emissions, Brighter Economy, will evaluate these opportunities across five key areas—power generation, electricity consumption, passenger vehicles, natural gas systems, and hydrofluorocarbons—which together represent 55 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions.

The final installment of the Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) was released on November 2 in Copenhagen, Denmark. Following three reports by IPCC Working Groups released over the past year, the synthesis report is the most exhaustive and authoritative climate study to date.

Following is a statement by Jennifer Morgan, Director, Climate and Energy Programs, World Resources Institute:

Today European Union leaders agreed on a climate and energy package that sets a domestic carbon reduction target of “at least” 40% by 2030.

Following is a statement by Jennifer Morgan, Director, Climate and Energy Programs, World Resources Institute:

Transport Sector Key to Closing the World’s Emissions Gap

Next week at the UN Climate Summit in New York City, leaders from business, national government, and cities will convene to discuss bold actions to address climate change in various sectors, including transport.

And while climate change is an international challenge, climate action in the transport sector is proven to create significant and immediate development benefits at the national and local levels.

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