UN Climate Summit 2014: LIVE BLOG

WRI will be liveblogging during the 9/23 summit, tracking major announcements and offering expert commentary throughout the day.

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deforestation

New Small Grants Fund Can Help Civil Society Groups Combat Deforestation

On the heels of the Global Forest Watch (GFW) launch comes the GFW Small Grants Fund. The Fund, which we’re opening up for applications today, aims to support civil society organizations around the world to use the GFW platform in innovative and impactful ways. We have pledged an initial $375,000 for 2014 and are accepting applications through June 30. The Fund offers local organizations from around the world the chance to improve forest management in their own communities.

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FORMA: A Near-Real Time Alert System for Tropical Forest Loss

Updated maps of forest damage can take years to produce, making it difficult to know where to focus limited enforcement efforts.

But it doesn't have to be this way, thanks to advances in technology. Global Forest Watch, the near-real time forest monitoring application released by WRI and partners last week, is powered in part by FORMA, a monitoring system that issues monthly forest loss alerts for the humid tropics in Asia, Latin America, and Africa. FORMA (FORest Monitoring for Action) is designed to help people managing forests respond more quickly to unwanted forest loss. Learn more about the system through our new issue brief.

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Indonesian Fires Bring More Haze to Southeast Asia

Clearing land for timber and agriculture is likely to blame for Indonesia's latest bout of fires. According to data from Global Forest Watch—a new online system that tracks tree cover change, fires, and other information in near-real time—roughly half of these fires are burning on land managed by oil palm, timber, and logging companies—despite the fact that using fire to clear land is illegal in Indonesia.

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9 Maps that Explain the World's Forests

With Global Forest Watch, everyone from business executives to policymakers to indigenous groups can find out what’s happening in forests around the world—and use this information to take action. Now that we have the ability to peer into forests around the globe, a number of telling stories are beginning to emerge.

Learn more about how you can make your own map, here.

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Global Forest Watch—Join the Movement

We know remarkably little about what is happening to forests. This information gap is a key reason why the world loses 50 soccer fields’ of forests every minute of every day.

But it’s also a gap that’s about to become significantly more narrow with the launch of Global Forest Watch today.

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