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Securing Rights, Combating Climate Change

How Strengthening Community Forest Rights Mitigates Climate Change

Securing Rights, Combating Climate Change analyzes the growing body of evidence linking community forest rights with healthier forests and lower carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from deforestation and forest degradation.

This report makes a strong case for strengthening the rights...

High-Resolution Satellites Help Monitor and Respond to Fires in Southeast Asia

Today, in Jakarta, WRI, DigitalGlobe, the Indonesian government, Google, Esri, and a host of other partners launched Global Forest Watch Fires, an online platform for monitoring and responding to forest and land fires in Southeast Asia.

It features near real-time satellite images from DigitalGlobe, fire alerts from NASA, a text messaging alert system, mapping of burn scars from Google Earth Engine, wind direction and air quality data, land-use and concession maps, and much more.

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JAKARTA, INDONESIA— As the dry season begins in Indonesia, the risk of fires and haze is growing. On July 23, the World Resources Institute (WRI) and Indonesia’s National REDD+ Agency (BP REDD) will launch Global Forest Watch Fires (GFW-Fires), an online platform to monitor and respond to forest and land fires in Southeast Asia.

Q&A: Why Are Community Forests So Important?

Governments, civil society, and donors are working to strengthen community forest rights in many countries.

A new report by WRI and the Rights and Resources Initiative, to be released on July 24th, shows governments can meet their climate change mitigation targets by protecting community forest rights.

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Tar Sands Threaten World’s Largest Boreal Forest

According to data from Global Forest Watch, an online mapping platform that tracks tree cover loss and gain in near-real time, industrial development and forest fires in Canada’s tar sands region has cleared or degraded 775,500 hectares (almost two million acres) of boreal forest since the year 2000. That’s an area more than six times the size of New York City. If the tar sands extraction boom continues, as many predict, we can expect forest loss to increase.

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