You are here

climate change

Displaying 101 - 110 of 575
  • Blog post

    New Greenhouse Gas Accounting Tool Will Help China’s Cities Pursue Low-Carbon Development

    Low-carbon development has become the core theme of China’s urbanization. In fact, it’s one of the country’s key strategies to achieve its target of reducing carbon intensity by 40-45 percent by 2020.

    China’s National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) has identified 36 pilot cities and assigned them several tasks.

    Share

  • News
  • Blog post

    Global Efforts to Tackle Poverty and Climate Change Must Come Together

    When the secretary general, Ban Ki-moon, takes the floor of the UN general assembly this week, he will address two of the most pressing challenges of our time: poverty and climate change.

    Share

  • News
  • News

    Location: WASHINGTON DC

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today announced proposed emissions standards for new power plants. According to the EPA, electricity generation represents one-third of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions. These rules are one of the important steps the EPA can take to reach the U.S. goal of reducing greenhouse gas emission by 17 percent below 2005 levels by 2020.

  • Blog post

    Coastal Communities in Virginia Lead the Way on Local Climate Action

    “The time to act is now… We cannot afford to do nothing.”

    This was the message of Mayor Will Sessoms from Virginia Beach, VA, delivered last Friday at a conference on "Adaptive Planning for Flooding and Coastal Change." Like so many cities along the Atlantic coast, Virginia Beach is at the frontlines of climate change, experiencing impacts like sea-level rise and recurrent coastal flooding. But as we learned at the event, the city and its surrounding communities are emerging as leaders in engaging in initiatives to address these issues.

    “We are not as well prepared as we need to be to address the full scope of projected realities in the year 2100” Mayor Sessoms stated, “and we can, and must, make continued improvements.” His message was echoed by a group of bipartisan mayors and state delegates, city planners, legal experts, and university scientists. They stressed that while state and federal governments often struggle to move beyond the political debate of whether manmade climate change is happening, residents of the Tidewater area of Virginia are focused on developing a robust response to rising seas and recurrent coastal flooding.

    Mayor Sessoms’ sentiments paralleled the earlier statements of Democratic Mayor Paul Fraim from Norfolk, VA that "[t]his is one of the greatest threats of our lifetime,” and “a threat that we can no longer afford to ignore."

    Share

  • News

    Launch Features Former President of Mexico Felipe Calderon, Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg of Norway, President Juan Manuel Santos of Colombia, and International Ministers and Representatives

    Former President of Mexico Felipe Calderon and ministers from a diverse group of countries will launch a major new international initiative, the Global Commission on the Economy and Climate, comprising former heads of government, finance ministers, and leaders in the fields of economics, business and finance.

  • Blog post

    New Study Sheds Light on Methane Leakage from Natural Gas

    Natural gas wells represent a significant source of U.S. greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, as many of them leak methane, which is more than 20 times more potent than carbon dioxide. But while scientists know that “fugitive methane” is a concern, there’s much uncertainty about the full extent of the problem. A new study from the University of Texas—developed in partnership with the Environmental Defense Fund and nine natural gas production companies (Anadarko, BG Group, Chevron, EnCana, Pioneer, Shell, Southwest, Talisman, ExxonMobil)—sheds some light on this perplexing issue.

    Share

  • Blog post

    3 Important Messages from this Week’s UNFCCC Workshop on Scaling Up Climate Finance

    The last in a series of expert workshops and consultations under the UNFCCC’s work-programme on long-term finance concluded late yesterday. This 2013 extended work programme on long-term climate finance is designed to “identify pathways for mobilizing the scaling up of climate finance to USD 100 billion per year by 2020 from public, private, and alternative sources” and inform “enabling environments and policy frameworks to facilitate the mobilization and effective deployment of climate finance in developing countries.”I had the opportunity to participate quite actively in this year’s series, as WRI is working with co-chairs from the Philippines and Sweden to facilitate discussions on how to mobilize scaled-up finance for climate action.

    Share

  • Blog post

    3 Beginning Steps to Designing a National Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program

    A number of programs that require businesses to report their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have emerged in the past decade at the regional, national, and sub-national levels. Most of these programs operate in developed countries, but some developing countries are also showing an interest in adopting mandatory emissions disclosure programs.

    Establishing these programs is a resource- and time-intensive exercise. It can be a daunting task for developing countries with competing priorities and limited resources. So where can these countries begin as they consider setting up their greenhouse gas reporting schemes?

    WRI’s new working paper, Designing Greenhouse Gas Reporting Systems: Learning from Existing Programs, reviews corporate and facility-level greenhouse gas reporting programs in Australia, California, Canada, the European Union, France, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The paper identifies steps to implement a mandatory reporting program and discusses factors to be considered at each step in designing the program.

    It also discusses some strategies for developing countries keen to set up reporting programs. Developing countries may find it easier to adopt a gradual, phased approach to develop a reporting program. Engaging in the following three key steps allows developing nations to make the most of their more limited resources:

    Share

Pages

New Greenhouse Gas Accounting Tool Will Help China’s Cities Pursue Low-Carbon Development

Low-carbon development has become the core theme of China’s urbanization. In fact, it’s one of the country’s key strategies to achieve its target of reducing carbon intensity by 40-45 percent by 2020.

China’s National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) has identified 36 pilot cities and assigned them several tasks.

Share

Global Efforts to Tackle Poverty and Climate Change Must Come Together

When the secretary general, Ban Ki-moon, takes the floor of the UN general assembly this week, he will address two of the most pressing challenges of our time: poverty and climate change.

Share

Location: WASHINGTON DC

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today announced proposed emissions standards for new power plants. According to the EPA, electricity generation represents one-third of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions. These rules are one of the important steps the EPA can take to reach the U.S. goal of reducing greenhouse gas emission by 17 percent below 2005 levels by 2020.

Coastal Communities in Virginia Lead the Way on Local Climate Action

“The time to act is now… We cannot afford to do nothing.”

This was the message of Mayor Will Sessoms from Virginia Beach, VA, delivered last Friday at a conference on "Adaptive Planning for Flooding and Coastal Change." Like so many cities along the Atlantic coast, Virginia Beach is at the frontlines of climate change, experiencing impacts like sea-level rise and recurrent coastal flooding. But as we learned at the event, the city and its surrounding communities are emerging as leaders in engaging in initiatives to address these issues.

“We are not as well prepared as we need to be to address the full scope of projected realities in the year 2100” Mayor Sessoms stated, “and we can, and must, make continued improvements.” His message was echoed by a group of bipartisan mayors and state delegates, city planners, legal experts, and university scientists. They stressed that while state and federal governments often struggle to move beyond the political debate of whether manmade climate change is happening, residents of the Tidewater area of Virginia are focused on developing a robust response to rising seas and recurrent coastal flooding.

Mayor Sessoms’ sentiments paralleled the earlier statements of Democratic Mayor Paul Fraim from Norfolk, VA that "[t]his is one of the greatest threats of our lifetime,” and “a threat that we can no longer afford to ignore."

Share

Launch Features Former President of Mexico Felipe Calderon, Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg of Norway, President Juan Manuel Santos of Colombia, and International Ministers and Representatives

Former President of Mexico Felipe Calderon and ministers from a diverse group of countries will launch a major new international initiative, the Global Commission on the Economy and Climate, comprising former heads of government, finance ministers, and leaders in the fields of economics, business and finance.

New Study Sheds Light on Methane Leakage from Natural Gas

Natural gas wells represent a significant source of U.S. greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, as many of them leak methane, which is more than 20 times more potent than carbon dioxide. But while scientists know that “fugitive methane” is a concern, there’s much uncertainty about the full extent of the problem. A new study from the University of Texas—developed in partnership with the Environmental Defense Fund and nine natural gas production companies (Anadarko, BG Group, Chevron, EnCana, Pioneer, Shell, Southwest, Talisman, ExxonMobil)—sheds some light on this perplexing issue.

Share

3 Important Messages from this Week’s UNFCCC Workshop on Scaling Up Climate Finance

The last in a series of expert workshops and consultations under the UNFCCC’s work-programme on long-term finance concluded late yesterday. This 2013 extended work programme on long-term climate finance is designed to “identify pathways for mobilizing the scaling up of climate finance to USD 100 billion per year by 2020 from public, private, and alternative sources” and inform “enabling environments and policy frameworks to facilitate the mobilization and effective deployment of climate finance in developing countries.”I had the opportunity to participate quite actively in this year’s series, as WRI is working with co-chairs from the Philippines and Sweden to facilitate discussions on how to mobilize scaled-up finance for climate action.

Share

Pages

Stay Connected

Sign up for our newsletters

Get the latest commentary, upcoming events, publications, maps and data. Sign up for the biweekly WRI Digest .