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bus rapid transit (BRT)

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  • News

    Cities already house half of the world’s population and are expected to add an additional 75 million people each year. The rapid growth of cities, especially in the developing world, presents enormous opportunities and challenges to ensure that growth is equitable and sustainable.

    The upcoming World Urban Forum (WUF7), organized by UN-HABITAT, will address the ways cities can become more sustainable and livable for all residents.

  • News
  • Blog post

    4 Ways Cities Benefit from Bus Rapid Transit (BRT)

    New research shows that Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) can reduce travel time by millions of hours for commuters worldwide. For instance, BRT users in Istanbul, Turkey, can save 28 days per year by shifting from other transport modes to BRT. Commuters in Johannesburg, South Africa, meanwhile, can save an estimated 73 million hours between 2007 and 2026. That’s the equivalent of more than 9 million eight-hour work-days.

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  • Blog post

    Saving Lives with Sustainable Transport

    A new publication from EMBARQ explores the existing literature on the safety impacts of sustainable transport – primarily from the United States and Europe – and adding examples from Latin America and South Asia. The evidence suggests that projects that reduce traffic—such as congestion charging—and those that improve infrastructure—such as high-quality mass transport systems—can have a positive impact on traffic safety, in addition to numerous other co-benefits.

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  • Publication
  • News

    EMBARQ India received special recognition in the third edition of the Volvo Sustainable Mobility Awards, announced at last week’s Volvo Nobel Memorial Seminar in Bangalore, India. EMBARQ India’s submission, “Towards a Walkable and Sustainable Bengaluru: A Safe Access Project for Indiranagar Metro,” aims to improve safety and accessibility for bikers and pedestrians around Bangalore’s metro stations.

  • Blog post

    Smart Urban Design for India’s Sustainable Future

    Over the next two decades, India’s urban population is expected to double to more than 600 million people. Urban centers will soon comprise 40 percent of the country’s population and 70 percent of new employment.

    Today, India faces a choice: It could either continue to build increasingly sprawling and inefficient cities or embrace well-designed and people-focused models.

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  • Blog post

    Launching the iBus: How Public Outreach Led to Transport Success in Indore, India

    Indore, India—nicknamed “Mini Bombay”—is a booming city of two million people. Enter the “iBus.” Indore’s new Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) line—the iBus—recently completed 100 days of passenger operations.

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  • Blog post

    Boom and Bus: How Public Transport Can Curb Road Deaths as Our Cities Grow

    The world's cities are about to get a lot busier. Today, more than 50 percent of the global population lives in cities; by 2050, that figure will have risen to 75 percent.

    This mass migration to cities could result in crowded streets rife with air pollution, traffic accidents and congestion. Or it could see a boom in clean, compact urban centres with safe, healthy communities. The way the world's cities operate in the future will be shaped by how they are designed and developed now.

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  • Project

    The EMBARQ global network catalyzes environmentally and financially sustainable transport solutions to improve quality of life in cities.

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Cities already house half of the world’s population and are expected to add an additional 75 million people each year. The rapid growth of cities, especially in the developing world, presents enormous opportunities and challenges to ensure that growth is equitable and sustainable.

The upcoming World Urban Forum (WUF7), organized by UN-HABITAT, will address the ways cities can become more sustainable and livable for all residents.

4 Ways Cities Benefit from Bus Rapid Transit (BRT)

New research shows that Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) can reduce travel time by millions of hours for commuters worldwide. For instance, BRT users in Istanbul, Turkey, can save 28 days per year by shifting from other transport modes to BRT. Commuters in Johannesburg, South Africa, meanwhile, can save an estimated 73 million hours between 2007 and 2026. That’s the equivalent of more than 9 million eight-hour work-days.

Share

Saving Lives with Sustainable Transport

A new publication from EMBARQ explores the existing literature on the safety impacts of sustainable transport – primarily from the United States and Europe – and adding examples from Latin America and South Asia. The evidence suggests that projects that reduce traffic—such as congestion charging—and those that improve infrastructure—such as high-quality mass transport systems—can have a positive impact on traffic safety, in addition to numerous other co-benefits.

Share

EMBARQ India received special recognition in the third edition of the Volvo Sustainable Mobility Awards, announced at last week’s Volvo Nobel Memorial Seminar in Bangalore, India. EMBARQ India’s submission, “Towards a Walkable and Sustainable Bengaluru: A Safe Access Project for Indiranagar Metro,” aims to improve safety and accessibility for bikers and pedestrians around Bangalore’s metro stations.

Smart Urban Design for India’s Sustainable Future

Over the next two decades, India’s urban population is expected to double to more than 600 million people. Urban centers will soon comprise 40 percent of the country’s population and 70 percent of new employment.

Today, India faces a choice: It could either continue to build increasingly sprawling and inefficient cities or embrace well-designed and people-focused models.

Share

Launching the iBus: How Public Outreach Led to Transport Success in Indore, India

Indore, India—nicknamed “Mini Bombay”—is a booming city of two million people. Enter the “iBus.” Indore’s new Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) line—the iBus—recently completed 100 days of passenger operations.

Share

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