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U.S. Energy Abundance: Exports and the Changing Global Energy Landscape

Testimony of James Bradbury

Research by the World Resources Institute has found that cuts in upstream methane leakage from natural gas systems are among the most important steps the U.S. can take toward meeting our greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction goals by 2020 and beyond.

Key Findings

Executive Summary

Liquefied natural gas (LNG) exports present both opportunities and risks. Producing and delivering natural gas to customers is highly energy- and emissions-intensive, particularly when LNG is involved. Research by the World Resources Institute has found that cuts in upstream methane leakage from natural gas systems are among the most important steps the U.S. can take toward meeting our greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction goals by 2020 and beyond.

This testimony focuses on fugitive methane emissions and the many cost-effective solutions available for reducing them. It appears very likely that LNG exports from U.S. terminals would result in increased domestic GHG emissions from both upstream and downstream sources. Policymakers should more actively work to help achieve reductions in GHG emissions from throughout the natural gas value chain, if this valuable fuel and LNG are to be part of the solution to the climate change problem. Taking these actions offer economic, environmental, and geopolitical benefits, both in the U.S. and internationally.

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