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Building National Forest and Land-Use Information Systems:

Lessons from Cameroon, Indonesia, and Peru

This working paper examines the institutional, human resources, and financial capacities of three countries that have developed a forest and land-use information system, and highlights common enabling factors and challenges.

Key Findings

Executive Summary

Countries adopting forest and land-use-based climate change mitigation policies are investing in infrastructure and capacity to track the impacts of these policies. A major capacity gap is the lack of coordination among ministries and sub-national governments that regulate drivers of forest and land-use change from both inside and outside the forest sector. Improving communication, data integration and data access among institutions is a key step towards identifying land-use policies that can balance a range of cross-sector objectives, and tracking these policies over time. To accomplish this, countries should develop data management systems that integrate spatial and non-spatial data from multiple sources.

This working paper focuses on the development of forest and land-use information systems (FLUIS), which are data management systems that integrate forest and land-use data. More specifically, this paper examines the institutional, human resources and financial capacities of three countries—Cameroon, Indonesia and Peru—that have developed a FLUIS, and highlights common enabling factors and challenges.

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