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Stabilizing the global climate is the greatest challenge of the 21st century. Temperatures have exceeded global annual averages for 38 consecutive years. The impacts are being felt all around the world.

Extreme weather events are becoming more frequent and severe. Heat waves and drought plague many countries, destroying agriculture, increasing the risk of wildfires and endangering lives. Rising sea level threatens coastal communities and infrastructure by amplifying flooding and storm surge.

But there are approaches and technologies available now to overcome this global challenge. WRI engages businesses, policymakers and civil society at the local, national and international levels to advance transformative solutions that mitigate climate change and help communities adapt to its impacts.

Our international climate work uses analysis, innovation and partnerships to achieve effective national policies and an ambitious, equitable global climate action agreement. Our U.S. Climate Action initiative identifies cost-effective solutions for the United States to reduce its emissions in the short- and long-term. CAIT 2.0 provides a platform for stakeholders to explore, understand and communicate climate and emissions data. And the Greenhouse Gas Protocol helps hundreds of companies and organizations measure, manage, and report their greenhouse gas emissions.

Publications & Resources

5 Ways Missouri Can Meet EPA’s Proposed Power Plant Standards

As the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) moves forward with standards to reduce emissions from existing power plants—which are due to be finalized in June 2015—many states are thinking through how they will comply. WRI’s fact sheet series, Power Sector Opportunities for Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions, examines the policies and pathways various states can use to cost-effectively meet or even exceed future power plant emissions standards.

How Can Adaptation Finance Help the Most Vulnerable Communities?

Adaptation finance accountability is key to addressing obligations of national governments and international organizations to provide support, but actual funding decisions are often made without involving the populations hit first and worst by climate change, or without understanding how communities are vulnerable.

So who is accountable for making good use of adaptation funds, and who should hold whom accountable?

Building Climate Equity

Creating a New Approach from the Ground Up

For more than two decades, crafting global actions that all nations believe to be equitable has been a central challenge for international climate policy.

A new approach is required to resolve this challenge. Building on the experiences of 23 countries, this report demonstrates...

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