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WRI established its U.S. office in 1982. We work to improve water quality, increase awareness of local climate change impacts, and identify cost-effective emissions-reduction opportunities in the United States. Learn more about our Eutrophication and Hypoxia, Water Quality Trading, U.S. Local Climate Impacts Initiative, and U.S. Climate Action projects.

In his State of the Union address, President Obama presented his priorities for 2014, including the next steps to implement the Climate Action Plan.

Tonight, President Obama said that he would direct his administration to enact new emissions standards on existing power plants. He called for greater urgency to tackle climate change and asserted: "The debate is settled. Climate change is a fact."

Following is a statement by Dr. Andrew Steer, President and CEO, World Resources Institute:

Watching for Signs of Climate Action in the State of the Union Address

When President Obama addresses the nation later today, climate change is expected to be featured. The president recently said that one of his personal passions is “leaving a planet that is as spectacular as the one we inherited from our parents and our grandparents.” The next two years will determine if his administration can meet this standard.

Above and Beyond

Green Tariff Design for Traditional Utilities

This paper describes what draws U.S. commercial and industrial customers to renewable energy, and explores how traditional utilities could build on their strengths to deliver affordable renewable energy to customers.

5 Ways Minnesota Can Reduce its Power Plant Emissions

Thanks to efforts to reduce its coal use, Minnesota is producing more power while decreasing its carbon dioxide pollution. But the state has the potential to go even further.

New WRI analysis finds that Minnesota can reduce its carbon dioxide emissions 31 percent below 2011 levels by 2020 just by complying with its current policies and taking advantage of existing infrastructure opportunities. Achieving these reductions will allow Minnesota to meet potentially ambitious EPA power plant emissions standards, which are due to be finalized next year.

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