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Not Featured GeographyWRI Office

WRI established its U.S. office in 1982. We work to improve water quality, increase awareness of local climate change impacts, and identify cost-effective emissions-reduction opportunities in the United States. Learn more about our Eutrophication and Hypoxia, Water Quality Trading, U.S. Local Climate Impacts Initiative, and U.S. Climate Action projects.

National Climate Assessment Reveals How Climate Change Impacts Your Neighborhood

The National Climate Assessment, released today, is the most comprehensive assessment of U.S. climate impacts to date.

Here’s a look at how communities across the country are already being affected—as well as steps we can take at the local, state, and federal levels to rein in future warming.

Snapshots of Miami Sea Level Rise

Miami ranks as the most vulnerable city in the world to the risk of coastal flooding caused by sea level rise.

Despite Miami’s vulnerability to sea level rise, there is reason to be hopeful: Many of the city’s local leaders and community residents are emerging as innovators in local climate action.

U.S.-China Clean Energy Cooperation: Status, Challenges, and Opportunities

Testimony of Sarah Forbes before the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission

In an April 25, 2014 testimony, Sarah Forbes describes the context for US-China collaboration on clean energy, outlining the need for policies that encourage innovation throughout the value chain. She also highlights how collaboration with China can advance U.S. energy goals, and suggests ways...

How U.S.-China Cooperation Can Expand Clean Energy Development

Sarah Forbes testified before the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission, discussing U.S.-China cooperation on clean energy and its global impact on climate change.

Florida’s Vulnerability to Sea Level Rise Attracts Congressional Attention

As coastal communities across the United States continue to fall victim to drought, coastal flooding, and other impacts of extreme weather and climate change, leaders at the metropolitan and federal levels are beginning to take action. Yet, Congressional action is an essential but missing piece to comprehensively addressing climate change.

However, Florida's continuing sea-level rise vulnerability suggests Congress may shift its attention to climate impacts.

Drought Is Only One Explanation for California’s Water Crisis

As California lawmakers move forward with potential solutions to the state’s current water shortage, it’s important to consider the full context of underlying reasons for California’s water vulnerability.

Our research shows that about 66 percent of the state’s irrigated agriculture—its biggest water user—faces extremely high levels of baseline water stress. This means that more than 80 percent of the available water supply is already being used by farms, homes, businesses, and energy producers. It’s clear that even without drought, the state would be in trouble.

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