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WRI established its U.S. office in 1982. We work to improve water quality, increase awareness of local climate change impacts, and identify cost-effective emissions-reduction opportunities in the United States. Learn more about our Eutrophication and Hypoxia, Water Quality Trading, U.S. Local Climate Impacts Initiative, and U.S. Climate Action projects.

5 Essential Facts About Emissions Standards for Power Plants

On June 2, President Obama will unveil the latest—and likely greatest—emissions reduction policy since he announced his Climate Action Plan last year: new rules to limit carbon dioxide pollution from existing power plants. With power plants accounting for around one-third of U.S. emissions, these rules will address the country’s single-largest source of greenhouse gas pollution.

Unfortunately, there are a lot of misconceptions on what these standards are designed to achieve, the impact they will have, and why they’re so important. This blog highlights some of the most important aspects of these crucial actions.

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Power Plant Rules Are Critical for Curbing U.S. Emissions

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will soon unveil its first-ever emissions standards for existing power plants. These rules represent the most significant component of the U.S. Climate Action Plan—and moreover, they’re an essential step for overcoming the climate change challenge.

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Cutting Carbon: States Can Use What they’ve Already Got to Whittle Power Plant Emissions

As the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency prepares to release greenhouse gas standards for existing power plants on June 2, state officials are weighing options on the best ways to cut carbon dioxide emissions.

We have shown how some states may be able to comply with these standards.

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5 Ways Arkansas Can Reduce Power Plant Emissions

Arkansas has already taken steps to reduce its near-term power sector CO2 emissions by implementing energy efficiency policies. And the state has the opportunity to go even further. In fact, new WRI analysis finds that Arkansas can reduce its CO2 emissions 39 percent below 2011 levels by 2020 by implementing new clean energy strategies and taking advantage of existing infrastructure. Achieving these reductions will allow Arkansas to meet moderately ambitious EPA power plant emissions standards, which are due to be finalized in 2015.

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CAIT - U.S. States Greenhouse Gas Emissions

The CAIT 2.0 U.S. State GHG emissions collection applies a consistent methodology to create a six-gas, multi-sector, and comparable data set for all U.S. states. CAIT 2.0 enables data analysis by allowing users to quickly narrow down by year, gas, state, and sector.

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