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WRI established its U.S. office in 1982. We work to improve water quality, increase awareness of local climate change impacts, and identify cost-effective emissions-reduction opportunities in the United States. Learn more about our work in the United States.

Florida's Treasure Coast has turned toxic this summer, as a foul-smelling algae bloom resembling guacamole has made some of the Sunshine State's beaches untouchable. One cause is the controlled release of water from an over-full Lake Okeechobee into local rivers that flow east to the Atlantic and west to the Gulf of Mexico.

A climate change strategy for all of North America could transform how we address a defining issue of our time. The move would be unprecedented, but it is more possible than ever. Heads of state from Canada, Mexico and the United States have the opportunity at the North American Leadership Summit in Ottawa to begin the process by setting out strong continent-wide climate actions.

Celina Bonugli

Research Analyst

Celina is a Research Analyst with the Global Energy Program and Charge, the World Resources Institute’s signature initiative. Within the US electricity sector, Celina supports the facilitation of utility and corporate buyer collaborations in order to develop sound policy that promotes the use of renewable energy in traditional, regulated electricity markets. She also assists in the expansion of this work to India, China, and Indonesia.

WASHINGTON (MAY 12, 2016)— The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency finalized the first-ever federal standards for methane emissions from new and modified sources in the oil and natural gas sectors. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas pollutant, with up to 34 times more global warming potential than carbon dioxide, and it accounts for roughly one-quarter of human-made global warming. Methane valued at more than $1 billion escapes from oil and natural gas extraction processes in the U.S.

WASHINGTON (MAY 11, 2016)– New analysis from World Resources Institute shows that Wisconsin is in a strong position to meet or exceed its emissions target under EPA’s Clean Power Plan to reduce emissions from the power sector. WRI finds that Wisconsin can build on existing energy efficiency and renewable energy investments to reduce its emissions and realize more economic benefits for its residents. However, by weakening its existing programs and declining to increase existing targets, the state will hamper progress and ultimately make complying with the Clean Power Plan more costly.

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