You are here


WRI established its office in Mexico in 2016. As the EMBARQ program in Mexico for the past 13 years we've been working on urban mobility, transport policy, sustainable urban development, road safety, climate and energy efficiency. WRI México will continue working on Cities, and open Climate, Energy and Forests. Learn more about our work in Mexico

Visit the WRI Mexico website.

This post was written by Lord Nicholas Stern, president of the British Academy, and Felipe Calderón, former president of Mexico and a WRI Board member. It originally appeared on Project Syndicate.

This Friday, in its latest comprehensive assessment of the evidence on global warming, the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change will show that the world’s climate scientists are more certain than ever that human activity – largely combustion of fossil fuels – is causing temperatures and sea levels to rise.

In recent years, a series of extreme weather events – including Hurricane Sandy in New York and New Jersey, floods in China, and droughts in the American Midwest, Russia, and many developing countries – have caused immense damage. Last week, Mexico experienced simultaneous hurricanes in the Pacific and in the Gulf of Mexico that devastated towns and cities in their path. Climate change will be a major driver of such events, and we risk much worse.

This puts a new debate center stage: how to reconcile increased action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions with strong economic growth.

Jorge Macias

Urban Development Director, WRI México

Jorge Macias is the Urban Development Director for the Center of Sustainable Transport at EMBARQ Mexico. He previously worked as General Deputy Director for Sustainable Urban Development and as...

The world's cities are about to get a lot busier. Today, more than 50 percent of the global population lives in cities; by 2050, that figure will have risen to 75 percent.

This mass migration to cities could result in crowded streets rife with air pollution, traffic accidents and congestion. Or it could see a boom in clean, compact urban centres with safe, healthy communities. The way the world's cities operate in the future will be shaped by how they are designed and developed now.


Stay Connected