New: Pivotal Year—WRI’s 2015 Annual Report

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Indonesia

WRI established its Indonesia office in 2014. We work with leaders in business, government, and civil society to address climate change, forest restoration, forest governance, and access to information. Learn more about our work in Indonesia, including our Forests and Landscapes in Indonesia, Governance of Forests Initiative, and Access Initiative projects. Visit the WRI Indonesia website.

In Indonesia, dramatic satellite images of heavy smoke plumes show the large amount of pollutants being discharged to the atmosphere. The fires are extensive in areas with deep peat soils, suggesting high volumes of carbon are being released, contributing to climate change.

Global Forest Watch shows that some of the largest fires are on fully developed plantations, despite the fact that many of these companies are committed to eliminating fire in their management practices. The persistence of the fires—and the intensity with which they have returned—raises important questions.

Kebakaran terakhir di Indonesia kemungkinan besar berakar dari pembukaan lahan untuk pertanian, perkebunan, dan produksi kayu. Menurut data dari [Global Forest Watch] (http://www.globalforestwatch.org/)-sistem online baru yang melacak perubahan tutupan pohon, dan informasi lainnya secara nyaris seketika ** setengah dari peringatan titik api terjadi di lahan yang dikelola oleh perusahaan kelapa sawit, kayu, dan pulpwood**-meskipun secara hukum masyarakat dan perusahaan dilarang menggunakan api untuk membuka lahan.

Clearing land for timber and agriculture is likely to blame for Indonesia's latest bout of fires. According to data from Global Forest Watch—a new online system that tracks tree cover change, fires, and other information in near-real time—roughly half of these fires are burning on land managed by oil palm, timber, and logging companies—despite the fact that using fire to clear land is illegal in Indonesia.

Indonesia’s forest moratorium, a policy aiming to protect an area the size of Japan from development, represents one of the most ambitious conservation schemes ever established in the country. But is it actually making progress in improving the forest sector?

WRI’s new working paper, Indonesia’s Forest Moratorium: Impacts and Next Steps, aims to answer that question and more.

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